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Thread: Fantastic Four Reboot

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    No... just no! please no more reboots. If Hollywood is running out of idea's for movies why don't they open up the "movie machine" to the public and let us send in our own scripts and ideas?

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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    It's simple. In the last few years Hollywood is very picky about big budget projects. There were many failures that cost them dearly. That's why very often move scripts are rewritten just to fit in a lower budget. Hollywood would rather invest in a movie that have proven it's profit instead of risking in a new territory. Although Fantastic Four movies are considered to be flops, they still earned money 3 times higher than their budget. Imagine what will happen if they get a good story this time.

  3. #28
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    From MTV:
    'Chronicle' Director Josh Trank Is Perfect For 'Fantastic Four'
    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Wigler
    "Chronicle" had an awesome weekend. That's good news. The found-footage superhero flick is one of the coolest movies to arrive in the admittedly brief 2012 season thus far (check out our "Chronicle" review for reasons why we loved the movie), and any and all success is more than deserved in our eyes.

    But there's another reason why I'm pumped that "Chronicle" did so well at the box office this weekend: it further cements the argument that director Josh Trank is the right guy for the "Fantastic Four" reboot. He's already allegedly Fox's first choice for the franchise overhaul, and I'm convinced he's the right choice.

    Money Money Money
    The obvious one up front: "Chronicle" did business. The film's $22 million haul is almost double its $12 million production budget, so already it's a success when it comes to dollar-signs. Sure, "Fantastic Four" would be a considerably more expensive effort than "Chronicle," but Trank proved that he can do a lot with a little.

    Reviews Reviews Reviews
    Money aside, "Chronicle" delivered on quality as well. The movie currently boasts an 85% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes from critics and an 82% rating from audience members. People liked what they saw. Considering the dismal reactions to Fox's "Fantastic Four" (27%) and "Rise of the Silver Surfer" (37%), this franchise needs strong reviews, badly, if it hopes to stand another shot in the critical eye. Trank has only made one movie, sure, but that one movie hit big with the right people—the same people who would be lining up for Marvel's First Family's grand return.

    Power Power Power
    So, business and reviews aside, what makes Trank a fit for the Richards clan? For one, Trank gets power. "Chronicle" handled superpower discovery with an expert blend of imagination, joy and devastation, a wide array of emotions and responses seen in Reed, Sue, Johnny and Ben's own original transformations. If the "Fantastic Four" reboot goes back to square one with an origin story — and I'm betting that's what we're in store for — then Trank has certainly proven his ability to tell an origin with chaotic creativity rarely seen in other superhero films.

    Storm Storm Storm
    Another reason why "Chronicle" works so well: the kids. Trank gets youth culture because he's a young guy himself—only 25 years old. That know-how would prove especially useful for Johnny Storm, the Four's literal hothead. Chris Evans as Torch is a tough act to follow, and it'll take the right combination of actor, writer and director to top him. Trank is more than qualified for one piece of that equation: his Human Torch would be an incredible character to watch.

    Bad Bad Bad
    Trank also knows how to craft a compelling villain. Credit where it's due: Max Landis wrote a great script and Dane DeHaan turned in an awesome performance. But Trank's pacing of Andrew's transformation from tortured nerd to destructive menace was spot-on, resulting in a villain who you'll root for in one moment and root against in the next. I imagine (and hope) the filmmaker's take on the Fantastic Four's latest nemesis would be a bit less angsty, but no less complicated. Plus, refer back to Trank's imaginative interpretation of superpowers: can you imagine him bringing the Skrulls to the screen? Because holy wow, that would really be fantastic.

  4. #29
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by Albershide View Post
    It's simple. In the last few years Hollywood is very picky about big budget projects. There were many failures that cost them dearly. That's why very often move scripts are rewritten just to fit in a lower budget. Hollywood would rather invest in a movie that have proven it's profit instead of risking in a new territory. Although Fantastic Four movies are considered to be flops, they still earned money 3 times higher than their budget. Imagine what will happen if they get a good story this time.


    From Deadline:
    ‘Chronicle’ Tackles ‘Woman In Black’ For #1; Both Overperform For $22M Vs $21M Super Bowl Weekend; ‘Big Miracle’ Bombs $8.5M
    Quote Originally Posted by NIKKI FINKE
    Fox Filmed Entertainment chief Tom Rothman is one of the more controversial execs in Hollywood. When he gets it wrong, he gets it very very wrong. But when he gets it right, others copy him. I’m told that Rothman had a specific POV going into Chronicle: something original and fresh and strong that connected with young audiences who’ve been missing from the multiplexes during 2011. And he wanted it made with new storytellers and new actors. Now this weekend’s good reviews, ‘B’ CinemaScore, and young-skewing numbers (exit polls show 57% of filmgoers were under 25) indicate Mission Accomplished. Another in a successful line of found footage movies since 1999′s The Blair Witch Project, little 84-minute and mild PG-13 Chronicle cost just $12 million to make in South Africa and Canada with tax credits is from first-time director Josh Trank who also directed some scenes for the Paranormal Activity 2 DVD and screenwriter Max Landis, the son of infamous John Landis. Produced by John Davis and Adam Schroeder, the film plays like a personal documentary from an unseen amateur filmmaker as it chronicles the story of 3 teen angsters with telekinetic powers. Best of all, the pic takes aim at smug Seattle. Fox was hoping to open to an $8M weekend, so the $22M result should make the arrogant Rothman even more insufferable. His studio owns international, too, where it will top the UK, Australia, others. How it’ll fare on Super Bowl Sunday remains the only question mark, but Fox stresses that the audience is not just males. (And the big game, by the way, has a 50/50 male/female audience.)

    There’s so much interesting, not the least of which is the marketing. Fox sold the movie with zero newspaper ads. And used Twitter quotes instead of review quotes, even though reviews were strong. There also was an all-Skype press junket tapping into the tech theme from the movie. The first trailer on YouTube garnered more than 6 million views in a week and extraordinary social feedback. After the trailer launched on MTV.com in October, Fox found that the conversations/engagements it spawned was more than 15 million interactions in just 2 days on Facebook. (“That’s like everyone in greater LA talking about Chronicle 15 weeks before they can see it in theaters,” an exec tells me. “This was a huge signal for how people were responding to the materials.” The recent viral stunt – ‘Flying Teens’ on YouTube – exceeded all expectations and video was featured on national and local news outlets. Online influencers played a huge part: in early January Fox held a digital press summit and debuted never-before-seen footage to a select group of digital press. A custom film-themed video was released by DeStorm called “If DeStorm Had Telekinesis” which included a cameo of that other YouTube star Mystery Guitar Man. On January 8th during the Atlanta Falcons-New York Giants game, Fox sponsored the first ever motion picture-themed QR-coded “billboard” which flashed onto TV screens.

  5. #30
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    From Screenrant
    May 13, 2012
    ‘Chronicle’ Director Talks Found-Footage Films & ‘Fantastic Four’ Reboot
    Quote Originally Posted by John Hanlon
    Trank’s reported connection to the Fantastic Four reboot has been mentioned in numerous articles. I asked the director about such a connection but he was mum on the details:

    “I can’t comment on any [of] my personal roles. I can’t comment on any project in development…No comment and just cool things to come.”

  6. #31
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Quint chats with director Josh Trank about the technique and emotional hook of Chronicle! Plus he artfully dodges a Fantastic Four question!
    Quint:
    Well before I let you go, since we’re on the subject and Mr. Rothman confirmed that you are developing a FANTASTIC FOUR movie with Fox, I just wanted to touch on that if you don’t mind. I just saw THE AVENGERS and loved it, but it’s kind of sad to me that there hasn’t been a great FANTASTIC FOUR movie. There’s so much potential there and I’m hoping that your approach is going to be a little bit like what you and Max [Landis] did on CHRONICLE in really making us fall in love with the characters…

    Josh Trank:
    You know, I can’t really talk about anything, but what I will say is that I totally agree with you, that there needs to be a great Fantastic Four movie.

  7. #32
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    More Details on Mark Millar's Consultant Role at Fox
    Quote Originally Posted by Spencer Perry
    A few weeks ago, it was announced that comic creator Mark Millar would be taking on the Chief Creative Consultant role for all of Fox's Marvel properties. Since then he's spoken about his role, but never in a detailed capacity. Last night, he was asked about the tentative plans and how he got the gig on the latest episode of The Empire Podcast. Here's a few of the quotes:
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark MIllar
    "It came about for a couple of reasons. One of my friends Joe Carnahan was saying to them (FOX) Mark was involved with Marvel for years and a lot of the stuff that was used in The Avengers movie, the source material was a book I'd done called The Ultimates. He said, look Mark could be a really good resource for you and the guys at Fox had read The Ultimates and they said if he can bring that same sort of thing to the Fox lane of Marvel characters that could be really beneficial.
    "So Fox are thinking, 'We're sitting on some really awesome things here. There is another side of the Marvel Universe. Let's try and get some cohesiveness going.' So they brought me in to oversee that really. To work with the writers and directors to suggest new ways we could take this stuff and new properties that could spin out of it because the X-Men alone feels like a universe of itself. There's so many characters in there and so many great potential spin-off characters.

    "They asked me to come in and work out a plan. So unfortunately at this point I can't get too specific. I do have a three to four year plan of where things could go, but you know, I'll be working with guys like Matthew and Josh Trank, who's the new director on Fantastic Four, and just figuring out how everything can work together and not contradict each other. But I also don't want to make it too much of a mess either, with everyone showing up in everyone else's films.

    "What my dream is, as a fan, is that when you go and see any Marvel movie that it feels as if they're all taking place in the one universe like when you pick up a Marvel comic. You should feel as if they're all taking place in one big kind of cohesive place."
    The Empire Podcast #36 Is Here! - Mark Millar and the writers of Skyfall

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    Default Millar & hitch talk fantastic four

    From Newsarama 2007:
    WW: CHICAGO - MILLAR & HITCH TALK FANTASTIC FOUR
    It may be the one of the most anticipated new projects from a creative grouping since the Police reunited for their new concert tour, or Ben & Jerry created Chocolate Chop Cookie Dough...

    The comic book superstar pairing of writer Mark Millar and artist Bryan Hitch lives again, this time on Marvel's Fantastic Four..

    No, not Ultimate Fantastic Four ... Not a large-scale FF limited series ... The monthly Marvel Universe Fantastic Four.

    The duo take over the reins of the series in early 2008 with plans to return the series to the top of the Diamond sales charts, and by the sounds of things, they don't plan on leaving for a while...

    And oh yeah, and they plan on it being monthly!

    We spoke with Hitch and Millar this week about why's and what’s of their latest partnership…

    Newsarama: Okay fellas, it doesn’t take a very skilled interviewer to come up with this question, but considering your profiles, both individually and as a tandem, one can assume that you had a lot of options (perhaps limitless if you wanted to create something brand new), so why the Fantastic Four, and why now?

    Mark Millar: What's interesting is how close this came to not happening. It really was a fortunate accident for us.

    The plan had always been to follow The Ultimates with an X-Men relaunch where I would write the three main X-books and we were going to have Hitchy plus two other artists on these books for a year. I plotted my stories way back in 2004 so this is something we'd been planning for ages. We were very enthused, spoke about it on the phone almost every day and just kind of took it for granted this is what we were launching in January 2008. But last year someone casually mentioned that JMS was leaving Fantastic Four and they didn't have a new creative team in place. I tried to block it out of my head, but for the rest of the call I was just nodding and pretending to be listening, thinking how great it would be to write the real Fantastic Four book. This is like getting the keys to the family car as far as the Marvel Universe is concerned. Maybe even more than Spider-Man.

    I couldn't stop thinking about it and phoned Hitchy, who surprised me by being equally excited. We spoke for about three hours, building each other into a frenzy and then called Marvel. We wanted to shelf the X-Men plans and do Fantastic Four instead. Mike Marts (former X-Men editor) was very good about it, understanding we had to follow our mojo. And so we called Tom Brevoort and everything clicked into place beautifully. I started writing the book before Christmas an Hitchy started drawing shortly after he finished Ultimates 2 in the New Year. He had a few weeks to build up his drawing muscles again, but he's been working very consistently since about February, I think and pretty much bang on schedule.

    Bryan Hitch: The timing worked I guess. We'd planned to go over to rehoot (new technical term) the X-franchise and sort of had that in our diaries for a couple of years or so as Mark said but after the heavy lifting we'd both done on Ultimates and Mark had done on Civil War we both wanted to take the comic book equivalent of a beach holiday. I'd loved Mark's run on Ultimate FF, it seemed so full of life and a real counterpoint to the density and claustrophobia of Ultimates and I was really quite jealous that Greg Land got to draw it. The book seemed like it was in the same breathless, big scale, relentless mode of our separate runs at Authority and I really fancied something like that after Ultimates. Sort of a plate cleanser.

    I remember us chatting in the summer last year and it came up in conversation that FF was maybe going to be available and we both seemed to hit on doing it and by the end of the call a tentative suggestion had become an enthusiastic urge. It really got me through the last two issues of Ultimates too as I couldn't wait to start it. That double-sized crazy last issue was the fastest I'd worked on the Ultimates in years and was maybe a sign that I'd been a bit down and burned out for a while; slogging rather than enjoying myself as I once had. A spring had returned to my artistic step! Of course once Ultimates was penciled by Christmas I still had six weeks of other non-comics stuff to clear off my desk but I can't wait to start drawing every day now; it's just the most fun stuff I've worked on in a long, long time.

    NRAMA: Okay, so you’re both excited about the Marvel Universe Fantastic Four. But still, why the monthly series, as opposed to your own limited series of whatever length you chose, which again one has to imagine Marvel would have been amenable to?

    MM:
    Well, there are probably three reasons for this. One is that when you do a special project you can't really roll your sleeves up and operate on the book. You're essentially just borrowing the characters from the current writer and promising not to interfere with his plans. And there were some very fundamental things we wanted to do with the direction of the book which meant the main book or nothing. But as people who grew up with an enormous love for the book, there's something (and this will sound weird) very satisfying about flipping through your run of FF comic-books and seeing your run alongside the Byrne and Kirby issues. It feels nice to be part of the lineage.

    Also, the Fantastic Four was billed as “The World's Greatest Comic Magazine” and it's been a while since it really lived up there in the top ten. Again, there's that little fanboy part of us that wants to put the book right up there on the front-lines of the Marvel Universe. Other than a few spikes for events of promotions, it's only sold around an average 45-50K these past ten years and we wanted to just put it up there with the Avengers and Spider-Man books again. They told us the Avengers characters were dead and we shouldn't do Ultimates before we started, but we knew it would work and we feel the same charge here. When you love something it's contagious. We want this to be the book everyone is reading again.

    NRAMA: Since you already mentioned Kirby, give us your take on the revered first 100 issues? Is this for you – as it is many creators – the Marvel Holy Grail? How does that legendary run, inform your plans (if at all)?

    MM: Yeah, I think those first 100 issues tie with the first 100 Spider-Man comics as the greatest Marvel books ever. But the middle of that run from issue #35 to around issue #60 are just unbeatable in terms of creativity. What made FF work was that you had absolutely no idea what could happen next because it was constantly breaking the rules. Combine this with the endless new characters being introduced as villains and supporting characters and you have something akin to a universe by itself, something the book has been feeding off really for close to thirty years now.

    So our plan is to honor those first 100 issues not by imitating the ‘Kirby dots’ or the drawing style or recycling the characters we've seen brought back again and again. We're going to honor them by doing what Stan and Jack did and that's being as new and creative as possible. Naturally, we're going to see familiar touchstones of the FF universe, but we're only doing it when we have something new to say about them. A brand new way of doing them. For the most part though it's going to be new concepts, ideas, and a new supporting cast.

    What I loved about FF as a kid is that it was constantly evolving like a real family. People got married, people broke up with their girlfriends and found new ones, friends became enemies, enemies became friends, children were born, and so on. To a boy who had seen Clark Kent gulping and wishing wishing he could tell Lois Lane how he really felt for four decades this seemed incredibly radical and I want to apply that same radicalism to our run. Things are about to move on and the characters are going to find themselves in slightly different situations. It's the only way to keep the book fresh. I want it to feel as new as the book felt in 1965.

    NRAMA: How about those first 100 issues for you Bryan? Of course from an artist’s standpoint, Kirby’s contributions both conceptually and from an artistic standpoint are at least equal to Lee’s contributions. Mark just said something to the effect of not coming in and doing “Kirby-dots”, so if not direct visual inspiration, how does that run inspire you as the artists?

    BH: We've both said that sometimes it's better to remember the feelings the work inspired in you than it is to go back and look, slavishly follow and attempt to repeat. That's what we feel here. To take the example of "Kirby dots"; that was Jack's specific way of solving a problem, is way of delineating patterns of energy and all pre-computers. So many other avenues are open now that to specifically follow that technique, which may well have been ahead of it's time forty years ago, would date a modern comic.

    It's much more important to follow the spirit and intent of the thing than it is to attempt to slavishly reproduce it. I'm not and never will be Jack Kirby or John Byrne (whose run is arguably the equal of Kirby's for fun and invention; more coherent too) but I do remember how it felt when I read that stuff and that's what I want to reproduce. Or try to anyway.

    NRAMA: Okay, you’ve both now mentioned Byrne in addition to Lee/Kirby. So let’s just ask about any other stand-out creative eras and let you guys run with it?

    MM: I know it's fashionable to knock him right now, but I think Byrne's run actually gives Kirby's a real run for its money. I didn't read it as a kid and stumbled on it a couple of years back, but it's one of the reasons I wanted to do this book. I ate up every page. The storytelling is just beautiful and the radicalism seemed to be back. Again, you just didn't know what was happening next and it felt like the Fantastic Four (something other runs didn't always quite achieve). It was that perfect mix of the everyday and the cosmic that Stan and Jack captured so magnificently. Because the FF was always as much about them trying to find a new nanny for Franklin as fighting the Mole-Man.

    The secret to all the best stories is that they're rooted in the ordinary and supped-up to the fantastic. The Baxter Building is a dream version of the house we grew up in, the Fantasti-Car is a dream version of Dad's old Ford and so on. Even Doom is that weird Uncle your Mum and Dad don't speak to anymore. It's got to be rooted in the real world to work and Byrne was very good at this too. He and the original 100 issues are the two perfect runs, but there are others I love too like the Waid/Ringo issues and the ones immediately following Stan and Jack. The very first FF I ever had was a black and white British reprint where Magneto had captured Sue and Namor's bird, keeping them in little tanks and goading the FF and Namor. Calling them poofs or something on the cover. I think this was written by Roy Thomas and drawn by John Buscema. I never remember the American numbering because I read this stuff years later as a UK reprint, but that run was really definitive for me too. Likewise the Simonson issues. I only got these last week (I was too busy reading DC Comics in the 80s), but these look great.

    NRAMA: Conversely Mark, as Bryan mentioned you had a run on Marvel’s newest take on the FF - Ultimate Fantastic Four. What did you take away from that, and how if at all, did that play a part in getting you here?

    MM: I got great advice from Stan before I started and I've taken this onboard for the main book. He told me there was no idea too insane for Fantastic Four and that was actually very liberating. Some ideas are too crazy for the Hulk or Spidey or the X-Men, but the FF is where the crazy ideas live and breathe. You have to give them a hook a nine year old can understand, but they can be as wild as you like. This is what led to the Marvel Zombies (something that seemed so unlikely editorial actually laughed when I suggested it) and I've tried to bring that same head to this run too. I've been flying on it since I started and really having a good time. I sent Tom and Bryan the script for our ninth issue last week and I'll be working on ten on the plane home from Chicago.

    NRAMA: Bryan, is your process different from Mark’s? Do you approach this from a purely artistic standpoint, envisioning imagery and layouts in your head?

    BH: Well yeah, that's a natural sort of language for me but it's not so much the pictures as the pacing and story beats. The rhythms and tempo before the music's written. The actual notes and tune come when you sit down and start on solving the specific storytelling problems and indulging in the creative side of composition. Mark and I both wanted to write and draw our own comics but he ended up focusing on the writing and I focused on the drawing but it lends each of us a more full point of view.

    Comics are a visual storytelling medium which means they aren't radio plays and they aren't poster books. Too many writers never allow room for the visual pacing and too many artists don't apply their incredible drawing skills solely to needs of the story. If you can combine the two, it makes a good read. Mark has a strong visual sense and I have a strong story sense so although we come from different directions we are both on the same journey. No shortcuts, no easy takes; it's the best we can offer, always.

    It's almost a perfect creative partnership, which is why we have so much future stuff planned together no matter what else we do separately.

    NRAMA: Bryan, let’s stick with you for a moment… You’re fairly well responsible for introducing the term “widescreen” to the comic book industry. You kind of topped yourself in that regard with your what six? Eight page spread (?) in Ultimates 2 #13. That was more like IMAX than widescreen…

    BH: Yeah it was pretty wide but please God don't go upping the terms here; I'm not doing that every issue! It's funny but I don't go about trying to 'widescreen' everything I draw, these are terms others have used to describe or label an approach. I just draw stuff how I see it.

    IMAX comics, sheesh thanks. Mind you, if there's on Marvel book that could work on that visual scale it's FF.

    NRAMA: So not to put you on the spot, but should readers expect the signature layout/perspective style to carry over to FF?

    BH: It's certainly going to be familiar enough for those who follow my work but it's a different book so the approach changes to suit what I'm doing. A director like Spielberg can do Schindler's List, E.T., and, say, Catch Me If You Can. Three very different films but all unquestionably his; you can't approach every job the same way, it would be too formulaic but you do bring everything you have to the table every time and hope to hit your marks as fully as possible. You never aim for second best, do you?

    NRAMA: Okay then, do you have any new tricks in your bag for the FF?

    BH: Oh, I hope so. It would be pretty darn boring if I didn't. You always hope to bring everything you have to the gig and then make it something else, find some new avenues to explore. It's one of the reasons I wanted the book; it's so different from Ultimates and I had to learn a new approach for that project, learn so much about how to draw, perspectives, real world stuff. This is broader, more fun, more grand and spacious; a little lighter perhaps. It still has everything I could want for in storytelling opportunities, design, ideas and great character acting. Breath of fresh air.

    NRAMA: As no doubt frustrating as it likely is for you Bryan, we do have to ask about scheduling, since the FF is a series that has been monthly for Marvel’s entire history. From all indications it seems like you’ve been working on this for a while, how would you address reader’s concerns about the FF maintaining its monthly status when your’s and Mark’s run begins?

    BH: I'm drawing it quicker. I've been working on it for about five months and am four issues and nine covers in. Mark is writing issue # 10 now so he's galloping nicely. It's actually getting quicker the more into it I get but it's important to note that Ultimates is the only thing I've done that went the way it did. Authority was three weeks an issue and that's what I expected to do on Ultimates; it came as a huge surprise to me that I couldn't do it. Then again there's about three times as much on the page in Ultimates.

    Truth to tell, many of the problems with that book weren't with the physical side of drawing it, more the state I got myself into worrying about it. It's different on FF. I don't feel any pressure at all, in fact it's the most liberating work I've done in years.

    For better or worse, Ultimates became a magnum opus of sorts and you can't follow it with another one. I can relax. So I'm just setting out to hit the schedule and get some big, bold fun comics out and remind myself that it doesn't have to be hand-wringing, sweating, cursing, worry and poverty to make a good comic. It can actually be good fun, very rewarding and, in the great scheme of world problems, a walk in the park. I'm doing what I love doing: telling stories. It's my goal to win back the reputation I had before I did Ultimates and have a good long, unbroken run at the "World's Greatest Comic Magazine". So far so good. Much, I think, to everyone's surprise.

    NRAMA: As you touch on, part of the Ultimates issue was your closeness to the material, that fact that you created it and wanting to go back and continue to edit the art until the public saw it. Correct? Given the FF aren’t your creations, will that play a role in how you approach the pages? Is that why it’s been so liberating?

    BH: I think my neurosis is still well intact but if I've learned anything from that whole debacle on Ultimates is that doing what you describe didn't achieve anything but make the book late and lose me an enormous amount of money. It's been like coming out of a tunnel on FF, all of that angst, fear and worry that drove me to suicidal amounts of tweaking and 'fixing' has vanished to a degree and I seem to be running free. I'm still tweaking and playing, redrawing and adding stuff to get it the best I can offer and I imagine I always will on any project but those that have seen what I've done so far don't see any drop in quality, quite the reverse so I'm confident about getting it out and it being all right.

    I'm also going to stop reading the message boards too. No matter how much I labored Ultimates there was always somebody who said: "Is it just me or does Ultimates look rushed..?"

    I have such huge and ambitious plans for the next couple of years at Marvel and see this as just the beginning. Get this in on or ahead of time, make it good and build on that work. You'll hopefully see what I mean as we move into next year. A lot of work to do but having established both a good and bad rep on Ultimates I have a strong need to build on the good and make the bad stuff a memory.

    NRAMA: Fair enough, I’m sure there are readers who appreciate you again addressing it.

    So Mark, switching gears a bit, would you say your plans are “traditional”? Or do they move the FF into new directions?

    MM: It's a combination of both. After a period where it hasn't been the traditional FF, Reed, Ben Johnny and Sue absolutely take center-stage in the book for our entire run. So it feels very traditional in that sense.

    But we didn't want to do the same old bag of tricks and just re-heat old stories. I mean, we both agreed that if Galactus didn't destroy the Earth the last 30 times he appeared then chances are he'd be thwarted again. The first time you saw the Hulk facing off against The Thing it meant something because they were Marvel's two most powerful heroes and you wondered who was strongest. But if we did that now it would feel stale, like a faded photocopy of an age-old idea. So we want to move everything forward with new threats and new concepts that have you as worried as I felt when I was reading “The Coming of Galactus” on the bus to Scout Camp when I was ten. We want people turning the pages, unable to guess what's coming next.

    That also applies to the soap opera element of the book too. A superhero like Sue living with Reed before they got married was pretty shocking back in the days when black people had to give up their seats to whites. A superhero getting pregnant was just unheard of. So we want to play around with the soap opera stuff too and hopefully give something you've never really seen before. Everyone gets beefed up in our first issue and, closer to the time, we'll give details.

    NRAMA: So you kind of already took the wind out of the sails of our next question, which was going to be can you name your Four and say a few words about your take on each?

    MM: Obviously, it's Reed, Sue, Ben and Johnny. I understand why other characters have filled in from time to time and I've really enjoyed what Dwayne [McDuffie] did recently (perfectly complimenting what we set up in Civil War). But it really has to be Ben, Johnny, Reed, and Sue. I like H.e.r.b.i.e. the Robot as much as anyone, but the Fantastic Four are the Fantastic Four.

    My take? Well, Reed is not just the most brilliant brain on the planet, but he's also the leader of the team. A natural leader emerging from such a strong set of personalities means Reed has to be incredibly charismatic. They got this a little better in the second movie than the first, but Reed should be the guy who makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end when he walks into the room to solve a problem. He's the JFK of the group, Johnny being Robert Kennedy, Sue being Jackie O and Ben being the Peter Lawford with the street-fighting connections (if you want to get overly literal).

    Ben and Reed seem off best friends, but they compliment each other brilliantly. Ben is smarter and more sensitive than everyone thinks and Reed is more physical than he's often portrayed. The first time they met in college (I have the panel clearly in my head) Reed is impressed because he recognizes Ben from the football field. He isn't an egg-head. He's as brave as he's smart and this is why he's Mister Fantastic.

    Johnny, as we saw quite brilliantly in the movies, is the comic relief to some extent and often the reason they get tangled up on situations. He's outwardly flash and flamboyant, but again we're talking about a guy who loves his family so much that he's always hanging around and making sure everyone is okay.

    Sue is the glue that holds it all together. She's the one with the strongest links to each of them in the sense that her brother and her husband are on this team and her kids are being groomed for the family business. She's the invisible hand behind everything they do and, like most marriages, the one who cleverly makes all the decisions.

    NRAMA: Bryan, how about your take on the characters from a design standpoint? What do you immediately think of when you think of the four main characters? A certain physical trait? Do you see an actor or actress in your head?

    BH: Always but less so now the treatment is working.

    Thinking of someone familiar is a helpful physical starting point, especially when creating new characters but these guys are well established. I'd like to say that I labored over the way I ended up portraying them, honestly, it all came instantly and fully formed. I knew what I wanted to do, how to do it and what it would look like and I couldn't wait to get started. Somebody is going to have to pry this book out of my cold dead fingers. They used to have to do that with Ultimates but that was so they could publish an issue; in this case it's that I'm having such a great time I don't want it to stop. Every issue feels like I'm just at the start of something great and that enthusiasm continues to build and grow.

    My wife has never known me not working on Ultimates and thinks I'm a different man; happier, easier to live with; less grumpy and much more relaxed. Her saying that makes me realize how bad I'd let things get on that book. I know we're all happy with the results and those nice hardcovers and omnibus editions will sit nicely on the shelves for years to come but it was a compulsion and not always a good or healthy one.

    NRAMA: Okay fellas, so that all asked, any final, parting thoughts to leave readers with at this time?

    MM: It's going to be really, really good. We promise you.

    BH: It will be really really good, plenty of it, and on time...

    Now that we all know what title Millar and Hitch will be going, Newsarama thought you might want another look at all the images from the series Marvel has released to us so far....
    [/quote]

  9. #34
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Release Date Set for Fantastic Four Reboot - March 6, 2015

    Mark Millar: "Guys with death rays robbing banks - it's a world I'm really comfortable with"
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven MacKenzie
    You’re also a creative consultant for 20th Century Fox. What's the job description for that?

    I guess it's a kind of godfather position really. I'm overseeing all their superhero movies, X-Men, Fantastic Four, Wolverine and the movies that are related to them. It's quite a thing. Doing one movie is a big responsibility, but if you're suddenly doing six of them you're talking over a billion dollars of investment.


    Reboot seems to be the word of the moment. Are there cultural reasons behind that or is it just an excuse to tell a good story over again?

    I think it's actually something they try and avoid to tell you the truth. They're talking of doing a Fantastic Four reboot here at Fox with the guy who did Chronicle. That’s one I could get behind because I feel those first two Fantastic Four movies just weren’t that good.


    Where did they go wrong? All the ingredients were there.

    You're right in the sense that the movies actually made money – they made $400 million – but I think the fans would like to see it done a little bit differently. There were some unusual choices made in that film. It's still not clear entirely what the plan is, but I do think that Fantastic Four wasn’t as good as Spider-Man or The Dark Knight so if it’s rebooted, it will be for good reasons.


    Inevitably when they reboot Batman again they’ll make it more like the 1960s TV show.


    He's still my favourite Batman. Adam West to me is Batman. Christian Bale's a beefy impersonator. All these reboots seemed to happen about 10 years ago, you had Bond rebooted you had Batman rebooted. The ‘90s was all about retro, it was all about looking back on the previous 100 years and doing amalgamations of stuff. Oasis were the ultimate music example of that and Tarantino was the cinematic version. There was a fresh start feeling at the start of the decade and we're just continuing that now.

  10. #35
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    All I can say is good luck finding somebody hotter than Jessica Alba to play the Invisible Girl...

  11. #36
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    I'd love to see if this one can fit in with the recent Marvel movie universe as it should share it.

  12. #37
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Fantastic Four reboot is “like nothing you’ve seen before”
    Fox superhero guru Mark Millar talks Josh Trank’s “funny and likeable” Fantastic Four reboot
    Quote Originally Posted by James Hoare
    The last Fantastic Four movie, 2007′s Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer, may have crashed and burned in both the hearts of comic-book fans, and in the tills of box office bean counters, but there’s a sense of cautious optimism surrounding Chronicle director Josh Trank’s reboot, set for release 6 March 2015.

    Trank may seem like a wildcard choice to us, but to Fox’s Marvel superhero overseer Mark Millar, this rising indie talent is the perfect fit for the superteam that built Marvel Comics.

    “From what I’ve seen and from talking to him – he and I have had dinner a couple of times and we talk quite regularly as well – he’s contemporarising it,” said Millar, talking exclusively to SciFiNow. “I think he’s just making it work for the screen – he’s a great storyteller.

    “Chronicle, if you think about it, was similar to Fantastic Four in that it was a bunch of people who were transformed into something more than human – that turned out almost his calling card to come and do something like Fantastic Four.

    “What I wasn’t expecting actually was just how funny and likeable he could make this as well as getting the more awesome moments on screen – I use awesome in the traditional British sense and not the California sense awesome, you know? The Ridley Scott moments, and the Fantastic Four really are jaw-dropping in the same way you feel when you saw Alien for the first time. There’s some moments in this – not to be specific – that are actually gonna be phenomenal on screen and stuff you haven’t seen in a superhero movie before.”

  13. #38
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Mark Millar
    Just off the phone with Fox and some excellent news - Matthew Vaughn is producing Josh Trank's Fantastic Four reboot!
    Matthew Vaughn Boards Fox’s ‘Fantastic Four’ Reboot
    Quote Originally Posted by MIKE FLEMING JR
    EXCLUSIVE:
    X-Men: First Class‘s Matthew Vaughn has come aboard as producer on Fox’s Fantastic Four reboot. Chronicle‘s Josh Trank is directing from a script by Jeremy Slater. It’s set for a March 6, 2015 release.

  14. #39
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    What Does It Mean That Matthew Vaughn Is Producing The Fantastic Four Reboot?
    Quote Originally Posted by Brendon Connelly
    Is the Fox Marvelverse already splitting into two?

    Mark Millar tonight tweeted:
    Just off the phone with Fox and some excellent news – Matthew Vaughn is producing Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four reboot!
    Vaughn and Millar are, as I’m sure you’re aware, friends and collaborators. It’s not a huge surprise to see Vaughn getting involved here.

    But… meanwhile…

    Bryan Singer was speaking to IGN when he was asked about “plans for a Disney/Marvel movies approach to the X-Men franchise?”
    It’s just something we’re thinking about. Really my big focus was this movie. Because it’s really massive, and we’re going to start shooting soon. But we’re talking, [producer] Lauren Shuler Donner and I, and we’ll see.
    Note that he’s talking with Shuler Donner, and there’s no mention of Mark Millar.

    Now, it’s ridiculous but my own conversation with Singer is held under embargo right now and I can’t tell you what he said to me. But when I can, I will. And it directly addresses Mark Millar’s role in creating a Fox Marvelverse.

    And it’s very interesting.

    For now, just take the above two incidents as separate but fascinating facets of what the studio have planned. And expect some good things too – again, can’t say too much right now, but they’ve got some great stuff coming.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    From Motion Captured:
    Matthew Vaughn set to produce 'Fantastic Four' reboot at Fox
    Is this part of a move by him and Mark Millar to connect all of Fox's Marvel movies?
    Quote Originally Posted by Moriarty
    Mark Millar and Matthew Vaughn are slowly, surely building a shared filmography that is absolutely positively comic book crazy, and it looks like little by little, they're taking over 20th Century Fox's entire superhero agenda.

    When I first talked to Vaughn about Millar's work in the days leading up to his decision to option the rights to "Kick-Ass," it was obvious that Vaughn responded to Millar's storytelling on an almost chemical level. It's not just which stories Millar was telling, but his voice. Vaughn loves to throw a shot to the ribs of propriety whenever he can, and in Millar, he seems to have found a fellow provocateur.

    What I respect about Vaughn is the way he's built a very loyal crew that works for him not only when he's directing but also when he's producing. When I was on the set for "Kick-Ass 2," it may have been a Jeff Wadlow film, but I saw the same familiar faces in many of the key technical positions that I've seen on "Stardust" and "Kick-Ass" and "X-Men: First Class." His collaboration with Jane Goldman has been incredibly important to the overall voice of his films, and I would imagine Jane will be part of everything moving forward as long as Hollywood doesn't finally figure out that she's awesome and work her so hard that she's no longer got time to be part of each of Matthew's movies.

    And now, with Mark Millar, Vaughn seems to be teaming up on more and more things, and in particular, he's in the mix as Millar spearheads an effort to turn Fox's superhero films into some sort of shared world, or at least a unified approach. "Kick-Ass 2" is coming later this year, and one of the reasons that Vaughn decided against directing the upcoming "X-Men: Days Of Future Past" is because he and Millar are worried that someone's going to make something that might ruin their ability to shoot "Secret Service." They want to get started on that sooner rather than later, and last I heard, that was Vaughn's first priority as a director.

    He's still involved as a producer on "X-Men: Days Of Future Past," and now it looks like he's also going to be producing "Fantastic Four," which Josh Trank will be directing. Trank directing "Chronicle," which I think nicely established what sensibility he'll be bringing to the Marvel universe, and Jeremy Slater is set to write the film. You may not be familiar with Slater yet, but his script "Man Of Tomorrow" was about as strong a qualification as anyone could have offered for this particular job, and I know that Slater is a rabid Fantastic Four fan. He loves these characters, and it sounds to me like there's a very strong creative team in place.

    With Vaughn and Millar both taking larger and larger roles in Fox's overall superhero plan, it sounds like they're going to be a major part of figuring out how to create an overlapping reality that not only encompasses all of the Marvel properties that Fox owns, but that leaves room for what has become the holy grail for all of the studios in town right now, figuring out a way to cross their properties over into the world of "The Avengers." I would love to be in a room and hear the discussions about how Sony and Fox and anyone else holding a Marvel character plan to make the most of that in the very near future.

    For now, though, Fox just wants to make sure that the things they still own all work, and that audiences genuinely want to see as ongoing series. Sure, they managed to make two "Fantastic Four" films, but they both felt like contractual obligations, without a hint of the wit or the life that are certainly possible with the characters. It seems to me that "Fantastic Four" should be an even bigger, poppier, right down the middle mainstream entertainment than the "Spider-Man" films. I have always felt like "Fantastic Four" should be fun, and I didn't think the two films that Tim Story made were fun in any way.

    Finding a way to make a "Fantastic Four" that sets its own tone and somehow also will manage to connect to the world that Bryan Singer's "X-Men: Days Of Future Past" sounds like it is creating won't be easy, and I doubt it'll be that direct. I can't imagine they're going to spend a lot of energy making the connections explicit right off the bat. What it sounds like they're doing is making sure there is an overall integrity and reality that will sign these as Fox's movies, and Vaughn is part of that creative team that's going to be defining what that means.

    Right now, "Fantastic Four" is set for release on March 6, 2015, and I think it's going to be one of the most interesting of the superhero films currently in development. I am positively desperate to see the first image of the team, of the Thing, of the world itself, because I have faith we're going to see something new, and I hope worth the wait.

  16. #41
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Seth Grahame-Smith Polishes 'Fantastic Four' Reboot (Exclusive)
    Quote Originally Posted by Borys Kit
    Author and screenwriter Seth Grahame-Smith has done polish screenwriting work on Fox’s reboot of Fantastic Four, which Josh Trank is directing.

    Sources say that the new reboot is taking a grounded superhero and sci-fi approach to the heroes and will tap deep into the comics mythology, which featured not just the better-known villains such as Doctor Doom and Galactus but also alien races the Kree and the Skrull, and the anti-matter universe known as the Negative Zone.

    Grahame-Smith is the best-selling author behind Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, the latter of which was adapted by Fox last year. The multi-medium maven penned the script for the movie as well as the script for Dark Shadows, Tim Burton's take on the 1970s vampire soap opera.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    ‘Fantastic Four’ Starts Pre-Production in Vancouver
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Sticco
    Chronicle director Josh Trank is prepping to reboot The Fantastic Four, and pre-production has started in Vancouver.

    Here’s the tweet from @lemon_buzz:

    “The Fantastic Four reboot has arrived. Starting pre-production for a September 2013 start in Vancouver. #yvrshoots”
    What did you think of the first FF films? There were good and bad things in each and overall I didn’t hate them, but they did seem like a bit of a missed opportunity.

    Hopefully, with Mark Millar serving as creative consultant on this and X-Men: Days of Future Past there will be some crossover and Fox can start it’s own branch of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

    So, who do you to see in the four main roles?

    SOURCE: Twitter

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  19. #44
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    I wish Disney got back the rights

  20. #45
    Senior Member Razor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Well that's interesting.

    I think they did have something similar going on in the comic books not so long ago. And if my memory serves me right it had a flashy title like X4 (X-men vs Fantastic 4).

  21. #46
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryCanyon View Post
    I wish Disney got back the rights
    I'm honestly conflicted about that notion. On one hand, it'd be great to see one cinematic Marvel Universe which included all the heavies like the X-Men, Spider-Man, and the Fantastic Four alongside the Avengers. But on the other hand, I'm not so sure that we'd get that in the first place.

    The other studios like Fox and Sony know that superhero movies sell big time, so they don't want the rights to go back as long as the properties seem viable to them. That means that as long as Fox owns Fantastic Four's movie rights, we're definitely going to get a Fantastic Four movie. However, if Disney had the rights on a permanent basis (as the owners of Marvel outright), then there's no guarantee that we'd get a Fantastic Four movie at all is there? They've always been on a more neglected branch of the universe in the comics, so who's to say they wouldn't be neglected for film too?

    The other side of this is that Marvel has to dig up other properties that aren't so well known and make them well known. That's why, next year, we're getting a Guardians of the Galaxy movie. If you ask me, this is a great thing. People may love seeing superheroes on the big screen, but because Marvel has to dig up oddballs and obscurities for their own cinematic properties, the genre can stay fresh and interesting.

    If you want to see what it looks like when all the toys are in one toy box, take a look at DC. Warner Brothers is content to sit on their asses because they're never going to lose the rights to the DC characters, and they have access to the shiniest toys (being Batman and Superman). They're not in danger of losing any popular superheroes, and they're not obligated to drum up any obscure ones out of necessity. That's why they play it safe so much.

    Would Disney/Marvel play it safe like them? I'm not sure. I think it helps that there's such a thing as Marvel Studios, which needs to make Marvel movies in order to even exist. But as I recall, they now have the rights to Ghost Rider and the Punisher, and I don't think kid-friendly Disney is going to be doing very much with either of them any time soon. Certainly not the gritty, R-rated takes that those characters kind of demand (especially the Punisher). Maybe through one of Disney's more adult-oriented distribution labels like Touchstone, but that wouldn't necessarily fix the whole "cohesive universe" problem they'd probably want to go for.

  22. #47
    Senior Member Razor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by Razor View Post
    Well that's interesting.

    I think they did have something similar going on in the comic books not so long ago. And if my memory serves me right it had a flashy title like X4 (X-men vs Fantastic 4).
    Also I think the most interesting fight scene in X-Men vs Fantastic 4 movie should be Ice Man vs Human Torch. The fight scene between the two should be done in a way like it's really mind blowing.

    Then we have other interesting and equally mind blowing battles like Magneto vs Doctor Doom. I think they will learn to join forces later on being both villains, but I think at first they would try to kill each other.

    The Thing could take on Colossus earlier on. But later face off a higher profile X-Man such as Wolverine. In the earlier comic books the Thing did battle Wolverine. And it ended with the Thing having to wear a mask to conceal his damaged face (Wolverine was able to damage the Thing's face with his razor sharp adamantium claws).
    ff374.jpg

  23. #48
    Senior Member Horror Sober's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by Razor View Post
    Then we have other interesting and equally mind blowing battles like Magneto vs Doctor Doom.
    You just sold me on this idea.

  24. #49
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    'Fantastic Four': Michael B. Jordan Is On Board, But As Who?
    Plot details, shooting location for reboot also confirmed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zalben
    After months of speculation, we finally have some definitive information on FOX's "Fantastic Four" reboot. As first noticed by a site called Acting Auditions, actor Michael B. Jordan is officially on board the project, reteaming with director Josh Trank ("Chronicle"). In addition, we also have our first rundown of the revised origin for the Marvel superhero team and plot for the movie. But is that the whole story?


    First, a little bit of background: Fantastic Four is one of the two properties, along with X-Men, that are licensed by FOX, rather than sitting neatly in the Disney stable. Though the studio has already made one unsuccessful go at the franchise, the movies need to stay in production or the rights revert back to Marvel Studios. Hence a reboot of the property, which has been in development for several years. Jordan has long been rumored to be taking on the part of Johnny Storm, a.k.a. The Human Torch in the movie, but nothing else has been confirmed... Until now.


    The first clue came from Louisiana's government entertainment set, which lists productions happening throughout the state. Information for sites like these are usually submitted by production managers seeking permission to shoot in the area, so any info won't just be gleaned from the often unreliable superhero rumors sites. According to them:


    "Fox feature film 'Fantastic Four' starring Michael B. Jordan will begin shooting March 24th in Baton Rouge."


    Notice that they don't specify what part Jordan will be playing, but that's certainly a smoking gun if we've ever seen one.


    The second clue/info on the plot comes from Production Weekly, an industry magazine that lists productions, shooting locations and casting info. According to the Thursday, January 23 issue, "Fantastic Four" is produced by Matthew Vaughn and Kevin Feige; written by Jeremy Slater, Seth Grahme-Smith, and Simon Kinberg; and confirms that Joshua Trank is directing, with the only confirmed cast as Michael B. Jordan (again, without specifying a role).


    All of this isn't surprising, but what is, is the plot description:


    [spoiler]"Two friends (who end up being Mr. Fantastic and The Thing), starts with them being really young. An event happens at 16 that changes them, instead of being superheroes, they are basically owned by the government and used as weapons. (Miles Teller, Kit Harington and Richard Madden testing for Reed Richards/Mister Fantastic. / Kate Mara and Saoirse Ronan are being tested for Sue Storm/Invisible Woman. / June 19, 2015 release date.)"[/spoiler]


    [spoiler]For those not familiar with the Fantastic Four's comic book origin, the titular foursome test an experimental rocket, which ends up being bombarded with cosmic rays and granting them amazing powers. Even the "Ultimate Fantastic Four" comic book, which recast the team as teens working in a think tank run by the government, had them all getting their powers together; though this time due to a teleporter accident.\[/spoiler]
    [spoiler]Point being, perhaps even more radical than the revamped origin of their powers is that the Fantastic Four don't actually get their abilities at the same time.[/spoiler]


    The other point we'll mention, though this is pure speculation, is that we have actors confirmed as testing for Reed Richards and Sue Storm, but not Johnny Storm (The Human Torch) or Ben Grimm (The Thing). Yes, Jordan has been rumored to be the Human Torch pretty much since this project was announced; but given the plot's focus on the friendship between Reed and Ben, what if he's actually playing The Thing?


    It would be a bit of a left turn, but traditionally Johnny is the comic relief of the group, while The Thing is the heart and soul. Given Jordan's increased profile and versatility as an actor, it wouldn't be too surprising to see a switch, with Jordan playing the soulful Thing instead of the jokey Torch. It would also be "interesting" to see whether the notoriously closed minded comic book community would get more upset seeing the African-American Jordan cast as the traditionally Caucasian Johnny Storm, or the traditionally Jewish and Caucasian Ben Grimm.


    With shooting beginning shortly (in Baton Rouge on March 24, though it may head to other locations earlier), we should expect some official casting announcements soon.


    "Fantastic Four" hits theaters on June 19, 2015.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fantastic Four Reboot

    'Fantastic Four' Screen Tests: Emmy Rossum, Kate Mara and Miles Teller in the Mix
    Michael B. Jordan, who starred in director Josh Trank's "Chronicle," is the only actor attached to the reboot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Borys Kit
    Dr. Doom is said to be the villain of the reboot (the character appeared in Fox’s two previous movies and was played by Julian McMahon). The Hollywood Reporter's Heat Vision is hearing that the studio is likely to go for a big name and isn’t ruling out switching genders for the role.

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