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Thread: Godzilla

  1. #201
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Godzilla 2! With Mothra, Rodan and King Ghidorah


  2. #202
    Senior Member Razor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla


  3. #203
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    News of Godzilla 2. It will have three new monsters and the screen time for Godzilla will be about 10-15 minutes at the end of the movie when he kicks everyones ass and walks away with a city in ruins...
    http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=121103

  4. #204
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    Comic-Con Crapfest: Movies
    Quote Originally Posted by Nikki Finke
    LEGENDARY:
    Godzilla 2 was officially announced by Thomas Tull who then intro-ed a video message from director Gareth Edwards (also helming a Star Wars spinoff). Fanboys whooped when 3 popular monster names flashed on screen – Rodan, Mothra and Ghidorah – who are joining the franchise. Rights holder Toho Co Ltd gave Legendary the go-ahead for sequels and spinoffs.


    Rights holder Toho Co Ltd gave Legendary the go-ahead for sequels and spinoffs.

  5. #205
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 2

    'Godzilla 2,' 'Skull Island' And The Risk Of Legendary's Monster Mash
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Mendelson
    Since it was at $498.7 million on Sunday following a robust $6.95m debut in Japan, Godzilla has presumably passed $500m at the worldwide box office. By most standards, the Warner Bros. (a division of Time Warner, Inc.) and Legendary Pictures release is a pretty solid hit. The Gareth Edwards film cost $160m to produce and has now earned 3.125x its budget in theatrical alone. The film earned mostly strong reviews and Mr. Edwards snagged himself a Star Wars picture off of the film’s $196m worldwide debut weekend. But by one very specific standard, one that I was watching all summer, it has fallen short. Gareth Edwards’s Godzilla sold less tickets in America than Roland Emmerich‘s Godzilla. This odd factoid only highlights the odd concept of Legendary Pictures seemingly charting its tent pole future with Universal (Comcast Corporation) with something a reborn monster mash.


    I had a piece specifically dealing with the box office performance of the newest Godzilla versus the 1998 version in the back of my head for awhile now, but I was waiting until the new film crossed $500 million worldwide. Said milestone was passed within days of a couple major Comic-Con* announcements, which means I had to do some quick big-picture expansion. Warner Bros. announced that Godzilla 2 was absolutely happening and Gareth Edwards was returning to direct as soon as he was done with his Star Wars spin-off. Then, Legendary and Universal announced a King Kong prequel entitled Skull Island for November 4th, 2016. Couple that with the already announced Pacific Rim 2 and the monster-filled Warcraft adaptation and, as Dorothy Pomerantz noted on Saturday, Legendary is basically establishing itself as a major producer of expensive old-school monster movies. But the monster movies we’ve seen, outside of the somewhat lightning in a bottle Jurassic Park series (Universal is indeed dropping Jurassic World next June), haven’t exactly been “monster” hits.


    The biggest such film outside of the first two Jurassic Park films, Peter Jackson’s King Kong, is still (inexplicably) considered a box office bust despite grossing $550 million worldwide on a $207m budget back in 2005. I’ve said for nine years that the film was the victim of insane expectations that compared it to Titanic, but the conventional wisdom is still that the critically-acclaimed remake was a box office under-performer (I just watched it and our rave reviews in 2005 are still accurate). Back in 1998, Godzilla was absolutely expected to rule the summer movie season. But the Roland Emmerich film received horrible reviews and its $44 million Fri-Sun debut (the biggest of the year) and $74m Wed-Mon debut (one of the biggest six-day totals in history at the time) was viewed as an instant disappointment for Sony.


    The $130m production ended up with $136m domestic and $379m worldwide, just under 3x its production budget in an era when marketing didn’t necessarily cost as much as the film itself and when DVD was just emerging as a powerful secondary post-theatrical revenue stream. Godzilla 2014 technically made more money, it actually ended up selling less tickets (23 million) than the 1998 version (29 million) in America. Not accounting for any 3D/IMAX bump, Godzilla 1998 grossed $236m domestic when adjusted for 2014 inflation while its worldwide inflation-adjusted total would be around $675m not accounting for 3D or IMAX bumps or even the obvious expansion of overseas markets over the last sixteen years.


    Godzilla 1998 was a flop for grossing $379 million worldwide and Godzilla 2014 is a big hit for earning $500m+ in 2014, even though the earlier film sold fewer tickets than the newer film both here and abroad. Now when discussing inflation in situations like this, it is always important to remember that today’s audiences have lots more competition for their entertainment dollars than they did back in 1998. It’s still a telling sign of the shifting expectations and shifting scales of what qualifies as a hit film in this day-and-age as well as the advantage of being perceived as an underdog versus the preordained top dog in a summer box office race.


    Also of note is that this new Godzilla was obscenely front-loaded in America, barely earning back double its $93 million opening weekend ($199m and counting). The critics mostly applauded and most hardcore fans approved, but the swiftness of its domestic box office seems to imply that the general audience either care or didn’t care for what they saw. Pacific Rim was more passionately received by geek-centric critics than by general audiences. The film opened with $37m and ended its domestic run with $101m. It is only getting a sequel because it earned $309m overseas, including $111m in China alone. Audiences aren’t exactly loving these mega-budget monster movies. Even if they are willing to try it once (Clash of the Titans with $493m), they aren’t necessarily going twice (Wrath of the Titans with $305m).


    Or (speculation alert) maybe Pacific Rim is getting a sequel (and an animated series, natch) as part of Legendary’s overall battle plan, an attempt to create a somewhat unified monster-mash brand with Universal to go along with the studio’s attempt to revive their classic 1930′s horror icons (Dracula, the Mummy, etc.). Universal doesn’t have its own superhero/sci-fi franchise, Fast & Furious may be done after this current installment, and blockbuster fortunes are not made with the likes of The Bourne Legacy.Perhaps, along with cheap comedies and Illusion animated features, Universal wants to be the home of tent pole monster movies, ones that offer the potential for an interconnected universe.


    Whether or not all of these disparate properties will eventually form some kind of interconnected universe is a question yet-unanswered (Godzilla is still with Warner Bros. so I wouldn’t expect a Godzilla vs. King Kong anytime soon), there exists the potential for any number of monster mash-ups. We may very well see not just an interconnected universe involving the classic Universal monsters but something akin to a King Kong Comes To Jurassic Park or At the Pacific Rim Of Madness mash-up (“The only thing that can stop Bourne… only hunts on a full moon!”). But the risk is that Legendary is betting its future as a tent pole producer on a genre that hasn’t been all-that-popular with general audiences, at least to the extent that the budgets will arguably demand.


    Can Mr. Edwards do that when A) Mr. Edwards’s original was (wrongly) criticized for not having enough monster mayhem and B) Godzilla 2 is set to have three new iconic monsters (Rodan, Mothra, and Ghidorah) for the title monster to fight? And will Skull Island be considered a big enough hit if it “only” grosses the same $217m domestic/$550m worldwide as Peter Jackson’s wrongly derided King Kong? Can Guillermo del Toro produce a cheaper and more mass audience-pleasing Pacific Rim 2 for April 2017? Legendary and Universal are taking a very real risk in basing their tent pole future in the likes of King Kong.


    But with great risk obviously comes the potential for great reward. The modern-day comic book superhero film was arguably on its last legs, fated to begin with Blade and end with Nolan’s Batman trilogy when Marvel Comics jump-started the genre with Iron Man in 2008. If Legendary can either keep the budgets at or below $150 million or deliver giant monster smack downs that play as well with general audiences as the geek-friendly crowds (hint: movie stars), the box office results may be, well, legendary. It will be interesting to watch over the next several years. Now we wait and see who directs Skull Island (Joe Cornish is rumored as of today) and who gets to play Monthra (I, as always, suggest Chiwetel Ejiofor).

  6. #206
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 1983

    AICN
    MondoCon releases amazing sounding panel, print and LP details!
    Quote Originally Posted by Quint
    The panel I'm the most looking forward to is William Stout's panel on the 1983 Godzilla film that never was. Stout did a bunch of storyboard and design work on this film that have never been seen before, but at this panel he'll be showing off a ton of it and talking about the movie never came to be.



    MondoCon 2014: Panels, Screenings, Exclusives and More!
    Quote Originally Posted by JUSTIN BROOKHART
    Godzilla 1983
    Panelist: William Stout
    Long before Gareth Edwards and even Roland Emmerich took on the iconic monster, Godzilla was set to make landfall on American soil, but it wasn’t his time. Writer Fred Dekker, FX artist Rick Baker and conceptual artist William Stout were just some of the big names involved in an early attempt at a US-produced feature film in the 1980s that few were even aware existed until now.


    Artist William Stout will take the audience through the entire feature film with over one hundred storyboards and conceptual art designs that he created along with Dave Stevens (creator of The Rocketeer) and Doug Widley (creator of Johnny Quest)

  7. #207
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Grant Morrison vs Godzilla

    Grant Morrison Wants To Do A ‘Godzilla’ Movie
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zalben
    Writer Grant Morrison has destroyed – and built – new universes in the pages of comic books for years. But never before has he created two of them at the same time, in the same comic – and luckily, this one has an appropriate title: “Annihilator.”


    The first issue of the eagerly anticipated book hits stores this week, so MTV News hopped on the phone with the writer to talk about his influences for the book, his flirtation with Hollywood, and how he’s dying to do a “Godzilla” movie:


    MTV: So what about working with Legendary… What’s that been like, and given the subject matter, is there any interest in feeding this back into the movie side of the company?


    Morrison:
    Obviously because Legendary has more experience as a movie studio than as a comic book company, there’s always potential. But I really wanted to do a good comic book, not even thinking about the film yet. To get Tom Cruise, that wasn’t the intention. I wanted to tell this story, and the chance to tell it with a company so deeply entrenched in Hollywood – I couldn’t say no.


    It was really targeted to Legendary, and I got along so well with Thomas Tull, and Bob Shreck, who was my Editor there. I felt comfortable there, and it’s been an interesting experience.


    MTV: What about the other way… Is doing a “Godzilla” movie, or something with “Skull Island” of interest to you?


    Morrison:
    I have a great idea for “Godzilla!” I have the best “Godzilla” idea, but no one has ever asked me it.


    MTV: Hey, I’ll ask you right now.


    Morrison:
    No, I’m not telling you my “Godzilla” idea! I want to use it. I’d love to tell you, honestly, but… No. [Laughs] One day, maybe, you’ll see my “Godzilla” idea.

  8. #208
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    Tokyo SOS Director EXTRA (SciFi Japan TV #27)
    In this exclusive 30 minute extended interview for SciFi Japan TV, GODZILLA: TOKYO SOS director Masaaki Tezuka discusses his early career at Toho, shares production secrets from his three films, reveals some of the original ideas for his movies, and much more!

  9. #209
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla's 60th Anniversary

    WSJ:
    Godzilla Was Very Different 60 Years Ago
    Directors, Designers, Actors and Producers All Had Ideas on How Godzilla Should Look

  10. #210
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    /film:
    ‘Godzilla 2’ Delayed, ‘Godzilla vs. King Kong’ Dated, and More Warner Bros. Release Date Shuffling
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Hall
    The obvious takeaway from this is that Warner Bros. and Legendary are getting serious about their plan to build a an entire cinematic universe for these iconic beasts…

    /film:
    ‘Godzilla 2’ Loses Director Gareth Edwards
    Quote Originally Posted by Angie Han
    According to Deadline, who broke the news, the split was an “amicable” one, and in fact had already been confirmed behind the scenes before the 2019 release date was announced earlier this week.

    ScreenRant:
    Godzilla 2: Director Gareth Edwards Drops Out
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy Schaefer
    Godzilla screenwriter Max Borenstein (who also co-penned Skull Island) wrote the current Godzilla 2 script draft, though it remains to be seen if another writer is recruited to revise the screenplay once a new director is hired for the sequel. WB and Legendary Pictures are approaching the Kong/Godzilla series as (essentially) a shared universe, so it stands to reason that Borenstein has been including connections between the Kong and Godzilla movies with his own script drafts. A different writer may be hired to better shape Godzilla 2‘s narrative to fit its new director’s vision, but the movie will still build up to Godzilla vs. Kong – possibly by introducing a giant monster-populated island (a la Destroy All Monsters), as Borenstein and Edwards had originally intended to do in the Godzilla followup.


    It remains to be seen how different Godzilla 2 feels compared to its predecessor, which had more of a traditional Godzilla movie structure (read: two narrative acts of steady build-up that pay-off with a monster brawl in the third act). Edwards’ 2014 reboot is something of a polarizing installment in the larger Godzilla franchise for that reason; some longtime fans appreciated his Jaws-inspired approach to unveiling the King of Monsters in full, while others just felt it tediously substituted giant monster spectacle for flat human drama. Whether or not the sequel will change things up for that reason, though, is another matter.


    Regardless of who signs on now, Godzilla is now yet another Legendary-backed creature franchise that has gone through a director switch between installments, following after Pacific Rim 2 (now being directed by Steven DeKnight) and Jurassic World 2 (which has Juan Antonio Bayona calling the shots).

  11. #211
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 2: King of the Monsters

    Scified:
    Mike Dougherty Confirms the Title is Godzilla: King of "THE" Monsters

  12. #212
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 2: King of the Monsters

    Variety:
    ‘Godzilla 2’ Finds Director in Michael Dougherty
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Kroll
    After first being hired to run the “Godzilla” universe writing room, “Krampus” director Michael Dougherty has now been tapped to direct the next installment in the monster movie franchise as well.


    When news first broke that Dougherty and his “Krampus” co-writer Zach Shields would be penning the sequel, reports surfaced that Dougherty would also helm the pic, but insiders said then that the deal was only to write the sequel, not direct. After months of work in the writers room, Legendary eventually extended an offer for him to direct as well.


    Alex Garcia will oversee the project for Legendary.


    In October 2015, Legendary and Warner Bros. made a joint announcement that all future “King Kong” and “Godzilla” films would be developed by Legendary and distributed by Warner Bros., starting with “Kong: Skull Island” in March. Legendary currently holds a distribution deal with Universal, but in order to re-team Godzilla and King Kong, Legendary decided to send the rights back over to Warner Bros. to be able to create this new “ecosystem” of giant super-species, both classic and new.


    “Godzilla 2” is currently dated for Mar. 22, 2019, with “Godzilla vs. Kong” set for May 29, 2020.


    Dougherty has strong ties to Legendary, having written and directed “Trick ‘r Treat,” one of Legendary’s first productions, which has become a cult hit. He then teamed with Shields on the recent Christmas horror pic “Krampus.”


    Dougherty, who’s repped by WME and Circle Confusion, also co-wrote “X2” and “Superman Returns.”

    THR:
    'Stranger Things' Breakout Millie Bobby Brown Set to Star in 'Godzilla' Sequel (Exclusive)

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  14. #214
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: BRINGING GODZILLA DOWN TO SIZE

    THR:
    Classic Godzilla Actors Recall Horror Stories from Wearing the Suit: "We Risked Our Lives"
    The gritty details of a 2008 documentary are worth revisiting in the wake of 'Kong: Skull Island.'
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Shanley
    With King Kong making his return to theaters this weekend in Kong: Skull Island, Heat Vision decided to look back at the other King of Monsters across the Pacific.


    Since 1954, Godzilla has wrought havoc upon Japan and inspired perhaps the biggest following of any movie monster. However, in the pre-CGI era, the actual process of bringing the character to life was an enormous challenge for the actors inside those rubber suits.


    In 2008, Toho Entertainment, the Japanese production company responsible for Godzilla's films, teamed with American filmmakers to produce the documentary Bringing Godzilla Down to Size: The Art of Japanese Special Effects. The doc featured in-depth interviews with the living actors who had donned the legendary rubber suit and brought everyone’s favorite reptilian demigod to life on the big screen.


    It's worth revisiting (see video at the bottom of the post).


    Haruo Nakajima, the original suit actor to portray Godzilla in 1954’s Gojira, Kenpachiro Satsuma, who began his career playing Godzilla opponents such as Gigan and Hedorah in the '70s before stepping into the leading role in 1984’s The Return of Godzilla, and Tsutomu Kitigawa, who first wore the suit in 1999’s Godzilla 2000, all discussed their unique characterization of Japan’s most notorious colossus.


    "My biggest influence came from bears," Nakajima explained. "The way bears move is very interesting."


    As one might expect, bringing a rampaging monster to life is often a perilous job, and the three men regaled viewers with tales of the unseen pitfalls that come with destroying a model set of Japan. “The effects crew pays close attention to every detail,” Satsuma said of the model environments. “So the set should break easily, right? Well, it’s not so easy!”


    Nakajima recalled destroying a constructed castle miniature that cost over 500,000 yen, twice his salary for the film, while Satsuma said that "the set took the crew 23 hours to build [and] I ruined it in 10 minutes."


    The suit itself also offered a unique set of challenges for the actors. “You can’t breathe well inside the suit, so an oxygen tube is attached,” Kitigawa explained. “But it’s removed during takes. Sometimes I started suffocating and had to stop filming.”


    “The original suit weighed 100 kilos (220 lbs.),” said Nakajima. “With all that weight, I couldn’t move much.”


    Nakajima also recalled working in freezing temperatures in the “Big Pool,” a large water tank used for filming ocean scenes, in which the actor had to work in an “ice bath” all day long. Satsuma shared the older Zilla’s concerns with the “Big Pool”, recalling the “gunk piled all over” the bottom. “And I know people peed in there,” he added.


    Even more harrowing was Kitigawa’s experience of being forced underwater by a crane. “I was standing by. The oxygen tube was attached, the crane started to move. As I went down the tube came off,” Kitigawa said. “I screamed, ‘Stop! I can’t breathe!’ But they kept pushing me into the water. Because of the danger, those shots were stopped. I never want to do that again.”


    “We risked our lives in that water,” Satsuma added.


    Yet, the actors were also responsible for so much of the evolution of the suits' designs. "I went to the special effects studio everyday," said Nakajima. "I'd suggest a slit here, a slit there."


    Kitigawa got even more technical in his suggestions to make Godzilla more mobile. "To improve the suit's flexibility I prepared data for the suitmakers, just like an F-1 racer," the actor recalled. "The suit for Godzilla: Final Wars was the most flexible ever."


    The suit itself was sculpted out of rubber and fiberglass, designer Shinichi Wakasa explained. "I feel passion for this work," said Wakasa. "That's why I'm still here."

  15. #215
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Alex Garcia King of the MonsterVerse!

    Kong: Skull Island's producer on Godzilla, monsters and more
    Producer Alex Garcia talks to us about Kong: Skull Island, Godzilla and Legendary's growing kaiju movie universe...
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Lambie
    I'm guessing you've already started planning the designs and scales of other monsters in the kaiju movie universe. Is it difficult making a character like, say, Mothra scary to a modern audience?


    I can't be specific about who we're introducing. But you might have said the same about Godzilla and King Kong - but with the artists and technology we have today, and the filmmakers' passionate love for these characters, there is something that transcends those initial designs. Whatever the core foundations of those designs are, rendering them with modern artistry, like at ILM with Kong, that becomes less challenging.


    The most challenging thing about it is having them feel authentic to the characters we all know. We want Kong to feel like Kong, and that means he should feel like Kong to someone who loves the 1933 version, and someone who loves Peter Jackson's film, and hopefully somebody who likes our film. Even though they're different versions of that character, they see a throughline in him.


    Kong: Skull Island is clearly the next step a larger movie universe you're building. So what are the challenges of building that, and do you have one person who's overseeing it all from a top-down perspective?


    We have a team within Legendary who are crafting it together, and our next film will be Godzilla: King Of Monsters, which starts shooting in June and comes out in 2019. Look, the most daunting thing is in reintroducing these characters in a new way that also feels authentic to their roots. And again, these are characters that people have loved for generations, so it's taking those foundations and then having them feel fresh and new. That's the biggest challenge. Then it becomes about making, as we said before, the characters' thematic and social resonance - weaving that in with the story. We aspire to make movies that work for audiences now as well as they did for us when we were kids.


    Godzilla was largely set in the present, while Kong: Skull Island's set in the 70s. Do you think future films will take a similar approach, where they'll alternate between past and present?


    Um... the timeline of Monarch and the universe will allow us to play with some of that. Right now, because Godzilla re-emerges in the 2014 film, that means the world is now aware of monsters. We're pushing forward from there, but there's always the chance that we could take a side trip.


    So are Tom Hiddleston and Brie Larsson contracted for any more of these films?


    Uhh... I can't say. Sorry, sorry!

  16. #216
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla


  17. #217
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla vs Terry Rossio 2!

    Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio (Part 2)
    Individual questions now on your various projects. For each of these I would really appreciate a brief note on what you contributed to the script, and how happy you were with the finished film. First, Little Monsters - where did this come from, and how did you manage to get it made?


    TR:
    “The film was based on my original (unpublished) short story ... really just a snippet, that Ted liked and was able to flesh out in an amazing way. We wrote an original screenplay, which caught the interest of a couple of producers, and sold to MGM. Neither of us much like the finished film. A common occurrence for us - people buy the script and throw it out, and what they replace it with is obviously not as good ... obvious to everybody, of course, except the people in charge.”


    On The Puppet Masters, how faithful to Heinlein did you try to be or were you allowed to be?


    TR:
    “Our original screenplay was very faithful to Heinlein. Yet another project where our original script was not followed. It's a shame, too; I still believe that book could make a great movie.“


    TE: “Actually, early in the process - I think before we turned in our first draft, even - we suggested the novel could give birth to a franchise, about government agents who investigate all types of strange and bizarre pseudo-scientific occurrences. The studio didn't see that potential at all. Of course, a couple of years later, The X-Files premiered (although I was actually thinking more in terms of UFO, an earlier aliens-and-conspiracy-type program).”


    TR: “The finished film is pretty terrible. Key stuff from the book was jettisoned. The end result was a film that seemed derivative; ironic, since Heinlein's work was actually the original exploration of so many ideas; he was almost always there first.”


    Why aren't you credited on Men in Black, and is it good or bad that your work on this film is an open secret?


    TR:
    “We aren't credited on Men in Black because the WGA didn't award us credit. Over the years, we've determined there isn't much logic to how credits are assigned by the WGA. As it turns out, pretty much no one knows that we worked on Men in Black; it is in no way an 'open secret.' Even Sony, the studio who released the film, doesn't remember that we worked on it.”


    Now for your unfilmed version of Godzilla. Oh man, so many questions! How did you cope with the difference between Western and Asian views of the Big G, especially the determination of Western audiences and critics to deride even the best Godzilla movies as Godzilla Vs Megalon-level crap? What instructions did you have from Toho? Why did you feel it important to create a second monster? Where would you like to see (a) the American Godzilla series, and (b) the revived Japanese Godzilla series, go? Which is your favourite Godzilla film, and which do you think is the best one (not necessarily the same thing)? Sorry to get carried away, but I'm a huge Godzilla fan...


    TR: “It was obvious to us that audiences wanted two things from a Godzilla movie: they wanted to be scared of this big unstoppable monster, and they wanted to root for him to kick ass in the end. Godzilla is, after all, the hero. That's why we invented a story that involved a second monster. In the film that was made, neither aspect is provided: Godzilla runs and hides, and we never get to root for him. Stupid mistakes, really.”


    TE: “We wanted a second monster because we wanted to move Godzilla from where he was in the first movie - unstoppable destroyer who had to be stopped - to where he was at the end of the third movie - defender of the earth, but still not someone you want stopping by unless it's really, absolutely necessary. A friend of mine, a big G-fan from way back, once said about Godzilla that, ‘It's not that he's a good guy - he just hates other monsters.’


    “I think the first one - the original, not the recut/redubbed/Raymond Burr-added American release - is the best one. And you can't beat Monster Zero for a great enemy, can you? After that, they all kind of blend together for me. I've liked some of the remakes/updates ... but that first one, with the skeleton at the bottom of the sea ... great stuff.


    “By the way, I am convinced that the whole ‘Godzilla is a metaphor for the A-bomb; analysis is wrong. In the original movie, the scientist who unleashes the weapon which kills Godzilla - metaphorically stopping the A-bomb - takes his own life afterwards. Had he died because he was trying to unleash the weapon, I would buy it - ‘We must make sacrifices necessary to prevent this from ever happening again.’ Naw, I think Godzilla is a metaphor for forces unleashed by man which he has no control over, for which he cannot predict the results, and for which he refuses to take responsibility. This makes the scientist's actions both correct to the metaphor, and makes him undeniably the hero of the movie. And I wish I could remember his name.”


    TR: “In the end, there's not much use in our answering questions about Godzilla. It would make as much sense to ask questions about James Bond, or Indiana Jones. Because we've never written a Bond film, or an Indiana Jones film - or a Godzilla film. The Godzilla film that got made didn't have anything to do with our work. Our credit on the film is just another testament to the vagaries of the WGA credit arbitration process.”


    TE: “I think it did have something to do with our work, with the basic approach we took to Godzilla - that he had to be presented as a serious threat, as something real. No dancing the jig or playing hoops with Charles Berkeley. That may sound like a no-brainer to Godzilla fans, but at the time we got the assignment, we were the only ones thinking that way. In fact, Devlin and Emmerich had been offered the project before we were, and turned it down because they didn't think Godzilla could be done except as an Airplane!-type spoof.


    “Later, after the movie was completed, we met Dean Devlin - the first and only time we'd ever spoken to him - and he said that it was reading our screenplay convinced them that it could be done seriously. Of course, they then chucked our screenplay and did their own, borrowing a few key elements from our story (specifically, Godzilla travelling toward New York with a purpose - although in ours, his purpose was to fight another monster, not to lay a bunch of eggs). So in a way, the Godzilla movie that got made was due to us - but it sure wasn't the Godzilla movie we wanted to see made. This is getting a little monotonous, isn't it? Let's talk about Aladdin some more.”



    How much liaison did you have with Neil Gaiman when writing your unproduced version of Sandman? What particular problems does his unusual outlook and imagination present to an adaptor?


    TE: “The hardest thing we had to do on Sandman was find a way to retell Gaiman's stories as a movie without losing what made those stories special in the first place. Our challenge was to do something which Neil had done with myths and legends in the pages of Sandman - telling them in a new way, which was not in violation of the way they were told originally.”


    TR: “That's a script that I still think we nailed perfectly. And part of why it's good is because it's far more Gaiman than us. Which is one way an adaptation can work. We met several times with Neil, and it was great to know he approved of the work. The problem - which I still cannot fathom - is how the folk at Warner Bros could spend money to acquire the Sandman property ... and then want to throw it out. His work is among the best fiction ever written, in any form. Why throw it away?”


    Please just tell me everything you're allowed to about your Iron Man project at this stage - the world (well, the readership of SFX) is agog.


    TR:
    “As usual, our goals for this project are high. We want to do a smart, tightly plotted, effective superhero movie, with a real character at the heart of it all, and never-before seen action sequences. Why lower your standards just because it's a comic book? The most exciting thing for us is what a perfect time it is for this story. We live in a time when power is being shifted from governments to industry. When Bill Gates becomes the most powerful man on the planet, you hope to hell that somehow he develops a moral centre, for the sake of us all. That's part of what we want to do with Tony Stark.


    “Happily, nobody has really done the definitive realistic superhero movie. The movies (for whatever reason) always take a step back, and don't take it seriously. But to fans, the stories are all real - they may be fun, they may have humour, they may be over the top ... but no fan ever thinks twice about whether it really happened. So we have an opportunity here to do a superhero the way everyone wants to see it.”

  18. #218
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Legendary's MonsterVerse

    io9:
    Godzilla vs. Kong, a Movie About Two Monsters Fighting, Somehow Requires Seven Writers
    Quote Originally Posted by Germain Lussier
    Whether or not a Godzilla vs. Kong film ends up working, the way Legendary and Warner Bros. have handled this franchise has been smart. Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla stood alone, as does Kong: Skull Island. Presumably, Michael Dougherty’s Godzilla sequel will as well. But there have been just enough hints to remind audiences that there’s a shared universe being built here. For example, besides the credits scene in Kong: Skull Island, there are a few lines of dialogue, almost throwaways, that made me sit up in my seat and think, “Oh, so that’s how they’re going to explain that.” But most people won’t even think about that until 2020 when they go back and see how all the pieces were laid out for them. These days, watching a shared universe film that you don’t know is one is a treasure. It’s just too bad it’s unlikely Pacific Rim could cross over at some point anymore.
    #MONARCH:

  19. #219
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 2017

    ANN:
    Godzilla Anime Film to Stream on Netflix Globally This Year

  20. #220
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    Thank you for the updates, this is great stuff. I had no idea they wanted to make a Godzilla film in the 80's by Hollywood. I hope to see some of those storyboards sometime.

  21. #221
    Senior Member Razor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla

    Kong and Godzilla would probably only fight in the beginning, and team up to fight a bigger threat in the end.

    Both characters are just too iconic to lose to each other. It's not happening. So at some point in the movie they're gonna stop fighting. But then it won't be nice to end the movie that way. So a 3rd monster is going to step in as the "villain boss" of the film (probably Ghidorah). And we see Kong and Godzilla fight side by side.

    You heard it from me first.

  22. #222
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla 2017


  23. #223
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla: Monster Planet *SPOILERS*

    ANN:
    Godzilla Anime Film Reveals Full Title, Story, New Visual, November Premiere

  24. #224
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Godzilla: Monster Planet

    ANN: Godzilla Anime Is Film Trilogy Starring Mamoru Miyano
    The full title of the first film is Godzilla: Kaijū Wakusei (Godzilla: Monster Planet).

  25. #225

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