Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27

Thread: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

  1. #1
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Warner Brothers and Joel Silver have finally found a director for their in-developement-hell project and it's John Steveson of "Kung Fu Panda" fame.

    To cash in on "Transforfmers"'s success, the filmmakers are gonna ignore the 1987 Dolph Lundgren movie to make a Sci-fi/fantasy/action adventure that is true to the roots of the cartoons (80's and 2000's), toylines and comics. This should be interesting!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Trailbreaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    11,118

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Hugo Weaving would make a great Skeletor, and no, it's not because he was Megatron.

  3. #3
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Here's my ideal cast for this movie and possible sequels:

    He-Man/Adam: Eric Bana.
    Skeletor: Hugo Weaving.
    Teela: Jessica Biel.
    Man-At-Arms: Nick Nolte.
    Evil-Lyn: Kate Beckinsale.
    Voice of Orko: Tom "Spongebob" Kenny.
    Hordak: Frank Langella or Tony Todd.
    Sorceress: Sharon Stone.
    King Randor: Gerald Butler.
    Adora/She-Ra: Brande Roderick (Baywatch beauty and Playboy playmate).
    BeastMan: Tyler Mane.
    TrapJaw: Bruce Campbell.
    Bow: Josh Harnett.
    Stratos: Ewan Mcgregor.
    Fisto: Huge Jackman.
    Grizzlor: Kane Hodder.
    Catra: Kelly Hu.
    Voice of Kowl: David Hyde Pierce.
    Manteana: Doug Jones.
    Glimmer: Michelle Trachenberg.
    Frosta: Natasha Heinstrech.
    MossMan: Ken Foree.
    Scorpia: Selma Hayak.
    Voice of Leech: Jeffery Combs ("Re-Animator").
    Voice of Swiftwind: Liam Neeson.
    Voice of Horde-Prime: Tobin Bell, James Earl Jones or Robert Englund.

  4. #4
    Moderator / formerly "Gunrock" The Great's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,721

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trailbreaker View Post
    Hugo Weaving would make a great Skeletor, and no, it's not because he was Megatron.
    get off the hugo weaving train. I hope it's a cast of unknowns and independent actors to be honest

  5. #5
    Moderator / formerly "Gunrock" The Great's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,721

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryCanyon View Post
    Here's my ideal cast for this movie and possible sequels:

    He-Man/Adam: Eric Bana.
    Skeletor: Hugo Weaving.
    Teela: Jessica Biel.
    Man-At-Arms: Nick Nolte.
    Evil-Lyn: Kate Beckinsale.
    Voice of Orko: Tom "Spongebob" Kenny.
    Hordak: Frank Langella or Tony Todd.
    Sorceress: Sharon Stone.
    King Randor: Gerald Butler.
    Adora/She-Ra: Brande Roderick (Baywatch beauty and Playboy playmate).
    BeastMan: Tyler Mane.
    TrapJaw: Bruce Campbell.
    Bow: Josh Harnett.
    Stratos: Ewan Mcgregor.
    Fisto: Huge Jackman.
    Grizzlor: Kane Hodder.
    Catra: Kelly Hu.
    Voice of Kowl: David Hyde Pierce.
    Manteana: Doug Jones.
    Glimmer: Michelle Trachenberg.
    Frosta: Natasha Heinstrech.
    MossMan: Ken Foree.
    Scorpia: Selma Hayak.
    Voice of Leech: Jeffery Combs ("Re-Animator").
    Voice of Swiftwind: Liam Neeson.
    Voice of Horde-Prime: Tobin Bell, James Earl Jones or Robert Englund.
    that is a horrible cast

  6. #6
    Senior Member Z28 Autobot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,625

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Great View Post
    that is a horrible cast
    I agree...they should be what you suggested..all up and comming or indi actors.

    and the cast should be about the size of the first Conan movie..

    and He Man has to be huge..
    he is supposed to be the most powerful man in the Universe..

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,713

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Z28 Autobot View Post
    I agree...they should be what you suggested..all up and comming or indi actors.

    and the cast should be about the size of the first Conan movie..

    and He Man has to be huge..
    he is supposed to be the most powerful man in the Universe..
    definately not the size of Eric Bana!:wtf

  8. #8
    Senior Member Hardkore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    L.A.~ lower Alabama
    Posts
    1,179

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    This is actually sort of old news. They have had trouble with different aspects of pre-production (getting a good script,getting a director,etc.).

    Here is an article dated 2007.

    http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=20604

    Warner Bros. and producer Joel Silver are working with Mattel to turn "He-Man and the Masters of the Universe" into a live-action film, reports Variety. Justin Marks is set to write the script. Silver will produce.

    He-Man was born as a Mattel action figure, and the toymaker created an animated series in hopes of selling dolls. The series became a cult favorite, but the brand was hardly helped by its first big screen incarnation, the campy 1987 flop Masters of the Universe that starred Dolph Lundgren as the title character and Frank Langella as his nemesis Skeletor.

    The franchise has been reimagined by the producer and the writers and pitched to Mattel as a classic good vs. evil battle, using the kind of visual effects strategy employed in 300. A warrior is touted as the last hope of a magical land called Eternia, which is being ravaged by technology and the evil Skeletor.

    Many of the characters will be informed by the mythology created in the four different cartoon series done since the 1980s.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Trailbreaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    11,118

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Great View Post
    get off the hugo weaving train. I hope it's a cast of unknowns and independent actors to be honest
    I refuse.

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,713

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trailbreaker View Post
    I refuse.
    whats the hugo weaving train

  11. #11
    Senior Member Trailbreaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    11,118

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by littleman794 View Post
    whats the hugo weaving train
    The whole group of people who want him to be Skeletor, and I shall remain on that train.

  12. #12
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,713

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trailbreaker View Post
    The whole group of people who want him to be Skeletor, and I shall remain on that train.
    oh..ok.....ill stay out of this one...

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sillypuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    364

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    If this movie can follow the script that I read at LatinoReview.com about a year back....it would be really cool. had lots of mythology and a really good origin for all of the characters.....
    Ironhide kills Barricade!!!

  14. #14
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Anyone thinks the female casting idea of mine is quite sexy even for She-Ra/Adora?

  15. #15
    Senior Member TIMtationX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,101

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trailbreaker View Post
    The whole group of people who want him to be Skeletor, and I shall remain on that train.

    *quickly runs and hops on train before it leaves the station*

  16. #16
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Anyone thinks this will erase the memories of Dolph Lundgren's movie? this could be the start of a new franchise and for the sequels they can have additional characters from the show and She-Ra in them.

    Well the film has actually been greenlighted and production will start next year. I think this could be a visual "LOTR" and "300" style fantasy epic that will sweep the audience off their feet.

    Hope this will be as cool as "Transformers" and maybe "G.I. Joe" will be the same.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Hardkore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    L.A.~ lower Alabama
    Posts
    1,179

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sillypuddy View Post
    If this movie can follow the script that I read at LatinoReview.com about a year back....it would be really cool. had lots of mythology and a really good origin for all of the characters.....
    I remember reading about that. From what I recall,it would be quite cool

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryCanyon View Post
    Anyone thinks this will erase the memories of Dolph Lundgren's movie?
    No,I still remember that one.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaY4HzVDVxI
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMH0y...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ceER...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oHY7...eature=related

    this could be the start of a new franchise and for the sequels they can have additional characters from the show and She-Ra in them.

    Well the film has actually been greenlighted and production will start next year. I think this could be a visual "LOTR" and "300" style fantasy epic that will sweep the audience off their feet.
    That would be cool.

  18. #18
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Well who would you cast for the movie and sequels especially the She-Ra chicks? and who would be sexy enough for Teela and Adora?

  19. #19
    Senior Member Z28 Autobot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,625

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    you can get a bunch of secondary actors or people that do mostly indie films.

    look at the cast of 300 mostly unknown actors yet the movie rocked.


    heck some of the actors from 300 could pull off He Man..thats the size you need.

    I think the cast should be limited to 4-5

    He Man
    Man at Arms
    Teela
    and a few others..nothing more..

    Jessica Alba as Teela would be nice..

    the villans can be a short list too. the way they did Ghost Rider a skull faced CGI can be done very nice.

    the other idea is He Man could be seperate than adam. He could be bigger. so it really is a transformation.

    Like have a Wreslter do the He Man part..heck Triple H looks like He Man.
    I know it sucks but who else could pull it off?


  20. #20
    Senior Member HarryCanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Well ok, but anyone thinks this could be a cool franchise? and do you think Hordak is the coolest bad guy in the MOTU galaxy?

  21. #21
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    806

    Default Jack Kirby and Masters of the Universe The Movie

    From Newsarama:
    Grant Morrison: Final Crisis Exit Interview, Part 1

    NRAMA: During the battle scenes in #6, you spent a surprising amount of time on Tawky Tawny. A lot of fans enjoyed the moment where he defeated Kalibak. So, the question, why was that moment important for you to include while other significant heroes were isolated or did not get big moments?

    GM: There was quite a heavy focus on the Marvel Family in Final Crisis so Tawny was part of that just as he was part of the mash-up of Kirby and the DCU that drew me to this project. I couldn’t resist drawing a connection between Prince Tuftan’s tiger tribe from Kamandi and Tawky Tawny. It just seemed right. Pure comics poetry.

    NRAMA: The Satellite scene and Justifiers attacking in modified TIE fighters? Are you stealing something back from George Lucas?

    GM: Yes. This wasn’t my idea – I asked for generic space shuttles in the script - but it does seem appropriate, given how much of Star Wars echoes ‘New Gods’ (although Star Wars just can’t come close to Kirby’s transcendental vision. The Force doesn’t even have a Wall! Real fans out there will of course be familiar with the He-Man film, Masters of the Universe, which is the closest any movie has so far come to copying New Gods outright. They even have the Boom Tube, while Skeletor is played as Darkseid and He-man is very obviously Orion).

    From TwoMorrows Publishing
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Hatfield
    Kirby's Fourth World: An Appreciation
    Written by & © Charles Hatfield
    From Jack Kirby Collector #6

    Beginning slyly with Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, Jack Kirby's "Fourth World" line (1970-1973) unleashed an astounding surge of creative energy which represented Kirby at his professional zenith. Jimmy Olsen, New Gods, Mister Miracle, and Forever People formed an eccentric, arguably brilliant, mythos which irrevocably changed the horizons of superhero comics. Whenever I reread or think back to Kirby's Fourth World, three distinguishing aspects of the tetralogy always come to mind: its originality of conception, its variety, and its urgent subtext.



    ORIGINALITY
    Structurally, the Fourth World was unprecedented: it introduced several new series, all centered on a single premise, all at once. This approach has since been imitated numerous times within mainstream comics (for example, in Epic's short-lived Shadowline saga, or more recently in superhero lineups from Malibu, Dark Horse, Milestone, and others). At the time it was a logical extension of the intertextual continuity Kirby and Stan Lee had pioneered at Marvel in the 1960s; yet the Fourth World went Marvel one better, by offering several variations on the same theme simultaneously.

    The basic conflict behind the Fourth World (Apokolips vs. New Genesis) perfectly distilled the dualism already inherent in Kirby and Lee's X-Men (with its good mutant/bad mutant theme). Kirby must have realized that such a conflict was too big, too promising, to be limited to a single book, so he took the next logical step - he launched several new series at once. The consequences of this step are still being felt today.

    Originality was also evident in Kirby's arsenal of ideas and gimmicks. Devices like the Boom Tube, Metron's Mobius Chair, the Mountain of Judgment, and, best of all, the omnipresent Mother Box, offered vivid symbols of human/machine interdependence. Bizarre beings such as Mantis, the Deep Six, the Bugs, and the Black Racer suggested that Kirby had been breeding characters in the back of his mind for years. Settings such as Armagetto, Supertown, the Habitat, and Zoomway offer breathtaking vistas and endless narrative possibilities, while the cosmic mystery of the Source, and the overarching menace of Anti-Life, gave the story a weird, mythic urgency



    VARIETY
    Another notable aspect of the Fourth World is its variety. While innovative in structure, the lineup allowed Kirby to revisit familiar genres: Jimmy Olsen and especially Forever People revived the Simon & Kirby kid gang formula, while Mister Miracle recreated the familiar "acrobatic hero" type which S&K brought to life with such characters as Captain America, the Sandman, Manhunter, and Stuntman.

    The Fourth World in fact revitalized these classic Kirby formulas. The Forever People trumped the S&K kid gang premise by dispensing with the usual adult chaperone (e.g., the Guardian in The Newsboy Legion, Rip Carter in Boy Commandos) and replacing him with the Infinity Man, a superbeing who appeared whenever the Forever People joined together around their Mother Box and uttered the key word "Taaru!" Infinity Man functioned much as the Guardian had in the Newsboy Legion's adventures, but did not seem much like a fatherly protector. Rather, Infinity Man seemed a composite of the Forever People themselves, a mysterious being summing up,the power and appeal of the whole group. The character was a brilliant stroke.

    Mister Miracle took S&K's acrobatic hero and gave him a new gimmick, one perfectly appropriate to Kirby's flare for balletic action: he was an escape artist! Scott Free's struggle to break free from his past was symbolically reenacted in each adventure by his daring escapes and stunts. Seldom has a superhero's ability or gimmick seemed so psychologically apt.

    The Fourth World's flagship title, The New Gods, represented something new. While its ostensible hero was Orion, and its central conflict the clash between Darkseid and Orion (a father-son conflict, as it turned out), the book's title allowed Kirby to focus occasionally on other characters - the bug Forager, for example, in the splendid two-parter about Mantis' invasion of Earth (#s 9-10), or Highfather and Darkseid himself in the classic "The Pact" (#7). New Gods was the most innovative of the Fourth World titles, and flexible enough to give scope to Kirby's restless imagination.



    SUBTEXT
    On rereading the Fourth World books, it's clear that Kirby's whole mind was engaged in the project. These comics represented Kirby's boldest bid to turn the superhero genre into a vehicle for ideas. New Gods and its companion titles were about something: the dualism of the Fourth World's premise allowed Kirby to use his heroes allegorically, to represent basic issues which obviously mattered to him very much. The not-so-subtle subtext of the Fourth World line gives it much of its urgency and character.

    The Fourth World books suggest that the essence of human life is choice, and that Anti-Life is the negation of choice - absolute domination. (Forever People No. 5: "If someone possesses absolute control over you - you're not really alive!") Darkseid, in his quest to discover the Anti-Life Equation, becomes Kirby's ultimate totalitarian villain, a tyrant determined to bend the universe to his will; in contrast, the gods of New Genesis become champions of human freedom. This conflict between control and freedom gives the Fourth World books their peculiar urgency. Clearly, Kirby believed in this struggle: no matter how outlandish the concepts, these comics are in dead earnest, and are refreshingly uncondescending.

    Subsequent revisions of Kirby have reinterpreted the fundamental conflict of the Fourth World along very different lines: Jim Starlin's Cosmic Odyssey, for instance, interpreted Anti-Life as a malevolent, sentient force, while J.M. DeMatteis' Forever People revival made Kirby's heroes champions of order over chaos. Neither one of these revampings is satisfactory, and in fact the cosmology imposed by DeMatteis is exactly wrong: in Kirby's Fourth World books, Darkseid did not represent chaos but order - suffocating order, robbing its subjects of choice and therefore life. Granted, Darkseid and his minions evoked chaos in their assaults on Earth, but with one ultimate aim: to ferret out the secret of Anti-Life and thus dominate all living things. In sharp contrast, characters such as the Forever People and Mister Miracle represented the possibility of radical freedom (a point nicely underscored in the 1987 Mister Miracle one-shot by Mark Evanier and Steve Rude).

    Tellingly, Kirby's champions are outsiders even on New Genesis - the Forever People are restless, Scott Free earthbound, and Orion too warlike to enjoy the peace of Supertown. The premise of the Fourth World requires these heroes to come to Earth: as ever, Kirby's concern is humankind, and his battleground our own backyard.

    Characteristically, the heroes of New Genesis are mostly youths, representing hope, energy, and enthusiasm. Kirby's identification with kids made itself strongly felt throughout the Fourth World line, most notably in Forever People and Jimmy Olsen - which broke new ground for mainstream comics by making heroes of "hippie" characters (e.g., the Forever People themselves, or the superscientific Hairies in Jimmy Olsen, who "live in harmony with whatever and whoever they contact"). Not surprisingly, some ambivalence about youthful rebellion survives in these books - particularly in Jimmy Olsen, with its covers emphasizing generational conflict between Jimmy and Superman - yet for Kirby to create such characters as the Forever People suggests a daring and sympathetic imagination, trying to keep pace with the youth culture of the time. These youthful characters perfectly embody the idea of freedom which underlies Kirby's saga.

    Like much of Kirby's work, the Fourth World suggests a largely untutored yet fiercely active mind, ever searching, always looking for ways to communicate grand ideas. Arguably, the Fourth World mythos was Kirby's boldest attempt to personify abstractions, to turn a battle of ideas into rip-roaring adventure. Kirby was fully engaged, heart and mind, in this effort - it's a damn shame he did not have the opportunity to see this dream through to the end while at the height of his creative powers.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    806

    Default Jack Kirby and Masters of the Universe The Movie

    From CBR: Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Cronin
    COMIC URBAN LEGEND: Masters of the Universe was a reworked Fourth World movie.

    STATUS: False


    A significant number of fans of the film Masters of the Universe suggest that the film is really a reworked Fourth World film.

    The film features characters that seem like they have analogues from Jack Kirby’s classic Fourth World series of comics: Orion (He-Man), Kalibak (Beast Man), Kanto (Blade), and Darkseid (Skeletor).

    The way that they travel in the film from Eternia to Earth is essentially a Boom Tube, and there’s a lot of other similar touches.

    However, the film itself was not intended to be literally a reworked Fourth World, although the intent WAS to make the film a tribute to Jack Kirby - just a tribute to ALL of his work, not just the Fourth World.

    Writer/artist John Byrne was quoted in Comic Shop News #497 as saying, “The best New Gods movie, IMHO, is ´Masters of the Universe´. I even corresponded with the director, who told me this was his intent, and that he had tried to get Kirby to do the production designs, but the studio nixed it.” This is probably where most of the confusion comes from, for while Byrne is basically correct, his statement that the intent of the film was to be a New Gods movie does not match what the director, Gary Goddard, wrote to Byrne in the letter column of Next Men #26, in response to a comment Byrne had made in an earlier column about the similarities between the film and the Fourth World comics.

    In that column, Goddard wrote:
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Goddard
    As the director of Masters of the Universe, it was a pleasure to see that someone got it. Your comparison of the film to Kirby’s New Gods was not far off. In fact, the storyline was greatly inspired by the classic Fantastic Four/Doctor Doom epics, The New Gods and a bit of Thor thrown in here and there. I intended the film to be a “motion picture comic book,” though it was a tough proposition to sell to the studio at the time. “Comics are just for kids,” they thought. They would not allow me to hire Jack Kirby who I desperately wanted to be the conceptual artist for the picture…

    I grew up with Kirby’s comics (I’ve still got all my Marvels from the first issue of Fantastic Four and Spider-Man through the time Kirby left) and I had great pleasure meeting him when he first moved to California. Since that time I enjoyed the friendship of Jack and Roz and was lucky enough to spend many hours with Jack, hearing how he created this character and that one, why a villain has to be even more powerful than a hero, and on and on. Jack was a great communicator, and listening to him was always an education. You might be interested to know that I tried to dedicate Masters of Universe to Jack Kirby in the closing credits, but the studio took the credit out.
    Still, whether the film was literally a Fourth World remake or not, the devotion to the work of Jack Kirby remains, and it is quite interesting on Goddard’s part.

    Thanks to Bright Raven for finding me the right issue of Next Men and Ryan Day for sending me a copy of the letter. Thanks to yo go re for suggesting this one (it was on the to-do list anyways, but I figure, might as well mention it).
    From Newsarama:
    Grant Morrison: Final Crisis Exit Interview, Part 1
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Brady
    GM: Yes. This wasn’t my idea – I asked for generic space shuttles in the script - but it does seem appropriate, given how much of Star Wars echoes ‘New Gods’ (although Star Wars just can’t come close to Kirby’s transcendental vision. The Force doesn’t even have a Wall! Real fans out there will of course be familiar with the He-Man film, Masters of the Universe, which is the closest any movie has so far come to copying New Gods outright. They even have the Boom Tube, while Skeletor is played as Darkseid and He-man is very obviously Orion).

  23. #23
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    806

    Default Jack Kirby and Masters of the Universe The Movie

    From CBR:
    When Words Collide: Tom Scioli Part 1 - He-Men and New Gods

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Callahan
    Tom Scioli is slated to have a big 2012. With the last two issues of his and Joe Casey's "GODLAND" slated to hit the stands later this year, and with a collected edition of the Scioi-written-and-drawn "American Barbarian" coming out from AdHouse sometime in the next few months, Tom is poised to blast comic shops with his explosive imagery and Kirby-esque designs.

    I wanted to find out, from Tom, what was going into his 2012 work, and we'll get to those kinds of questions and answers next week. First, we talked about the comics that inspired him, and took a close look at one particularly influential Jack Kirby issue that still resonates today.


    Tim Callahan: Okay Tom, we're going to talk about Jack Kirby soon enough, but let's not start there. Let's start with something formative outside of Kirby. Tell me about a comic or two that had an impact from you at a young age. What were some of your keystone comics?


    Tom Scioli: "The Vengeance of Skeletor" and "King of Castle Greyskull," both minicomics packaged with He-Man figures, with beautiful art by Alfredo Alcala. "Vengeance of Skeletor" was the more evocative of the two, with a really scary/psychedelic jungle and a sea monster in a bottomless lake. The imagery of "King of Castle Greyskull" didn't stick with me as much, but it was probably the more influential of the two, just in that I'd re-enact variations on its story when I'd play with my toys.

    I remember those comics! I don't have mine any more, but that was one of my early exposures to comics, now that you mention it. Certainly my first exposure to Alfredo Alcala. I remember buying the follow-up miniseries from DC, along with the "DC Comics Presents" team-up between He-Man and Superman, but those weren't as good as the minicomics packaged with the toys, from what I recall. And since, in my childhood head, the Masters of the Universe saga was kind of like a high-fantasy/supernatural Conan epic (though I wouldn't have known Conan yet), I was hugely disappointed when the Filmation cartoon came out, with Orko hamming it up. Orko was not in the Alcala comics, for sure.


    Did those Masters of the Universe comics lead into other comics for you? Or were they kind of isolated examples from that time in your life? Let me know the journey from those minicomics to your commitment to comics as an art form.


    I wonder if there are a lot of people our age who had that identical experience. I loved the fantasy of those early minicomics. I didn't like when they moved into a more comic-book direction, with ones like "The Ordeal of Man-E-Faces." When the Filmation cartoon came out, I hated it. I watched every episode, but I hated it. He-Man got domesticated. He was an enigmatic wanderer of the plains before. Now he had a mom and dad and a secret identity and comic relief. Beast Man and Skeletor were scary, in the cartoon they were buffoonish. I've later found out that those early minicomics were great because there wasn't a mythology set up yet. The writers could just do whatever they wanted. Once they set about deliberately crafting a bible that's when all those trite pre-fabricated elements started coming in.


    Those were my earliest exposure to comics, and they were ones that stuck with me. I'd buy A "Star Wars" comic here and there, or Superman. But it was out of a fandom to "Star Wars" or Superman, not to comics. I didn't have an older sibling or a parent who was into comics and gave me their old collection. Comics were something other kids were into, but not me. It wasn't until the late 80s, the post-Dark Knight period when comic stores started showing up, that I started checking out this thing called comics. That's where I got my first Kirby comics. I wanted to check out "old" comics and the two Kirby comics I grabbed looked suitably old.

    If there's a thread from those He-Man minicomics to my comics career, it's a path of following the things that hit those same notes. It started out as more of a genre thing than a comics thing. It went like this: "Star Wars" -- Thundarr -- He-Man -- Thor -- Dune -- Nexus -- Seven Samurai -- Ronin -- New Gods -- making my own comics. That's my personal chronology. For me, Kirby's "Thor" is linked to the 80s, "New Gods" is the 90s, because that's how I encountered them.


    When you took those early-for-you trips into your first direct market stores, what made you want to even seek out older comics instead of the shiny new ones on the shelf? Was it a function of the type of stories you visited -- I know in my case, the store I used to frequent was a used book store loaded with piles of old magazines and comics, so the older stuff was emphasized -- or was it just some historical interest on your part, or what?


    I really don't know. There were pricey Marvel Masterworks volumes with their devotional book design. There was the idea that old comics were valuable. There was a mystique surrounding old comics. Another comic that was formative for me was "Superman from the Thirties to the Seventies." It was the only comic you could get out of the library, so I checked it out over and over. Talking about it now, it seems like the pull of old comics would be really strong. That would be the most obvious thing that comics stores had to offer that 7-11 didn't.

    Of course I bought my share of new comics, too. The "new" comics I was drawn to, as it turned out, were also old comics. "Classic X-Men," which reprinted the Claremont-Cockrum-Byrne years was one of my favorite comics. I had no idea that these were old stories. Also "Marvel Tales," which was the Spider-Man reprint book, was another favorite, which was reprinting Claremont/Byrne Spider-Man stories at the time I was buying it.


    From what I've seen of your online presence, you are somewhat of a comics historian, or at least you have a strong interest in the aesthetic history of the medium, specifically around superhero comics. Is that a fair observation to make? And now that you're looking back on some of those stories that were formative influences on you, what do you think of them, from an aesthetic history perspective? Is there stuff that you wish you had seen earlier? Stuff you didn't like then, but really appreciate now, or vice-versa?

    Definitely. Everybody I know who makes comics seems to be very well-educated in the history of the comics traditions they are working in.

    Sometimes I wish I would've read more Kirby as a kid, but I think I was better off that I didn't get to read most of it until I was older. I think I needed Kirby more in adulthood than I did in childhood.


    The stuff I liked as a kid for the most part holds up, but that's probably because it helped form the baseline of my likes and dislikes. I recently read a bunch of those He-Man minicomics, and the Alcala ones are still the gold standard. The Bruce Timm ones are pretty neat, too. I liked Ditko's Spider-Man a lot, and I still do. I think I only had a couple of Ditko reprints, but I wish I'd had more. I think they felt contemporary because the 60s Spider-Man cartoon was still in regular rotation at the time. That's what Spider-man looked like. It didn't feel like something from another era. A kid in the early eighties consumed a lot of sixties and seventies culture. The Beverly Hillbillies, H.R. Pufnstuff, The Brady Bunch -- these were part of the eternal present.


    I didn't like the Spider-man comics that were new at the time I was reading them. It was the post-Watchmen era, and Spider-Man was too dark for me. It was the era of "Kraven's Last Hunt." People talk about how great that comic is, but I don't know that I'll ever be able to see it that way because it wasn't what my 10-year-old self was looking for from a Spider-Man comic.


    The Claremont/Cockrum/Byrne X-Men are still an enjoyable read and are nice-looking comics. I read a lot of Batman comics leading up to the Michael Keaton movie. I bought "Death in the Family" as it came out. For all their grimness, those comics were too sedate, too tame. I would've liked a little more silver age bombast, but I wouldn't have known to call it that. I still really like Jim Aparo's Batman art from that era.


    I guess something I really liked back then was the switch from newsprint, to the heavier white paper, with the higher resolution, more saturated color printing. I hated the feel of newsprint and welcomed the change. Now I feel the opposite way. Newsprint comics seem to have a more pleasing, more unified aesthetic.


    I didn't even realize Bruce Timm worked on any Masters of the Universe comics. Which ones did he do? What were they about?



    He drew "King of the Snake Men." It reads really well and has a few signature Timm-isms. "Grizzlor, the Legend Comes Alive" is not quite as good, but still pretty lively. Then there were a couple that he just inked, which were pretty good: "Escape from the Slime Pit" and "The Powers of Grayskull."


    I guess we should probably just move beyond listing which comics we liked and didn't like, growing up -- for the record, I thought the cover to "Elektra: Assassin" #1 was so silly I refused to buy it when it came out, and I thought Kirby was pretty terrible because all I knew him from back then were the covers to the "Super Powers" comics -- and really get into what's important: namely, Jack Kirby's best work. I'm certainly partial to 1970s Kirby, and though I appreciate his work in the early Silver Age, it's "New Gods" and "O.M.A.C." and "Kamandi" and even "The Eternals" and "Devil Dinosaur" that really get me excited about his comics. Those comics, in fading newsprint or in glossy hardcover collections, are still the things that I look to when I need to recharge and remind myself why comics are such an amazingly powerful visual form.


    Because you're an artist, and an aesthetic historian, and a Kirby man to the core, it might be beneficial for us to focus our Kirby discussion a bit by talking about a single story or a single issue and really go through it and talk about Kirby's work through that lens. What do you say? What's a Kirby comic that you'd like to really hone in on? What's the good stuff in that comic?


    It would be issue #7 of "New Gods," entitled "The Pact." That's the comic that really hit me hard and made Kirby jump to number one for me. It was "Star Wars" and He-Man and Thundarr and Dark Knight Returns and Hellboy all rolled into one, but 100 times better.


    Just reading that opening caption on page 1, it feels like the bible, it feels like the opening crawl of "Star Wars." I'll never know what it's like reading the New Gods without knowing "Star Wars." When I read it, it feels like "Star Wars," but that's because I've seen "Star Wars," so I know how to assemble these words and images in my head. What did readers in the 70s think when these books came out? Did it make any sense to them? Is that why the books weren't a massive hit, because you had to watch a movie that didn't exist yet in order to fully appreciate them?


    
I love how Kirby uses two exclamation marks for every sentence, until he needs to up the ante and go with three exclamation marks for emphasis!!!


    I understand the "Star Wars" connection, because the mythology has a similarity and, of course, I also don't know what it's like to read this stuff without having "Star Wars" in mind and yet...this doesn't feel much like the aesthetics of "Star Wars." This feels muscular, even on the opening, tranquil page in a way "Star Wars" doesn't. "Star Wars" feels like Alex Raymond to me, with its thin heroes and their swashbuckling ways. This opening page of "The Pact," and the scene that follows, feels like a rhino in a china shop. Kirby is bursting at the seams. The panels can barely contain his bulky forms and energetic lines.


    There is a precursor to this early-New Genesis stuff -- at least in terms of its setting -- in the "Tales of Asgard" work Kirby did in the back of "Thor." But this is a level up from that, right? It's got an intensity that even those mythic stories didn't have.

    I've read so many Kirby comics, the exclamation points are invisible to me. I grew up with the Odyssey 2, not the Atari. I don't know if you've read any of the instruction booklets from it, but it's all exclamation points.

    It gets more Star Warsy as it goes on. Funny you should mention Raymond, because to me this is Kirby doing full-on Raymond. Look at that first year of "Flash Gordon." Before the art got too pretty. "New Gods" is Kirby going back to his Raymond roots. Steppenwolf's design is Prince Barin. Heggra is Darkseid's mother. I wouldn't be surprised if Ming were his father. The Royer inking throws you off the Raymond trail, but look at the pencils. Kirby's pencil lines look like Raymond's brushstrokes.


    Also, "Star Wars" was pre-steroid era moviemaking. You couldn't find an actor who was built like a Kirby character. If it came out in the mid-80s the characters would've probably been played by more Kirby-esque actors.

    I'd read enough Thor comics that I got that Balduur and the unnamed Sorceress could be Balder and Karnilla. Although I pictured them as the stone-like megagods that Metron ran into in the opening pages of "New Gods" #5. I wasn't certain of the Thor connection, although it seems like the consensus is that's what Kirby intended. The references to the "Old Gods" in this issue sound mysterious, Lovecraftian.


    There's swashbuckling here, but it's Vietnam-era anti-war swashbuckling.

    This portrayal of Darkseid is an interesting one, because he looks just like full-fledged, ominously evil, nearly omnipotent Darkseid, but he doesn't seem to have a lot of power here, in these early days. He appears first with a robotic hand -- a "Killing Glove" built by his pal DeSaad, and his uncle Steppenwolf gives him grief about his "bizarre companions. Darkseid still has the arrogance we know and love, but this is the eager, ambitious young Darkseid, who later talks about how he's into new technology and he has the foresight to see where the culture is heading.

    "We must seek NEW roads to tread!!" he declares to his uncle.


    Meanwhile, in that earlier scene, Kirby throws in that tiny character bit where a steward, ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE, is refilling Steppenwolf's horn flask while the uncle gives Darkseid grief.


    It's not all wall-to-wall bombast, which is what many readers seem to forget.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Albershide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sofia, Bulgaria, Europe
    Posts
    4,223

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    I hope soon they will finally start doing this.

    http://www.deadline.com/2012/07/jon-...niverse-talks/

  25. #25
    Senior Member Albershide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sofia, Bulgaria, Europe
    Posts
    4,223

    Default Re: He-Man and The Masters of the Universe movie coming soon.

    Script rewrite means they're serious about this.

    http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=95845

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •