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Thread: Han Solo Begins

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Han Solo Begins

    CHRISTOPHER MILLER AND PHIL LORD TO HELM HAN SOLO ANTHOLOGY FILM
    THE DUO BEHIND THE LEGO MOVIE WILL DIRECT AN EARLY TALE OF THE SMUGGLER-TURNED-HERO, WITH A SCREENPLAY BY LAWRENCE AND JON KASDAN.

    Young Han Solo Found With Alden Ehrenreich
    The Millennium Falcon has a new pilot.


    EXCLUSIVE: Disney planning trilogy with Han Solo prequel and its star Alden Ehrenreich

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    Default Re: Star Wars Origins: 'Red Cup Episode I'

    Han Solo Spinoff Director Starts Movie With Greedo Shoutout
    'Red Cup' is up and running, Chris Miller shares.

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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins


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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    STar Wars June 20, 2017:
    A MESSAGE FROM LUCASFILM REGARDING THE UNTITLED HAN SOLO FILM


    The untitled Han Solo film will move forward with a directorial change.


    “Phil Lord and Christopher Miller are talented filmmakers who have assembled an incredible cast and crew, but it’s become clear that we had different creative visions on this film, and we’ve decided to part ways. A new director will be announced soon,” said Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm.


    “Unfortunately, our vision and process weren’t aligned with our partners on this project. We normally aren’t fans of the phrase ‘creative differences’ but for once this cliché is true. We are really proud of the amazing and world-class work of our cast and crew,” stated Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.


    The untitled Han Solo film remains scheduled for a May 2018 release.

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    'Star Wars': Why the Han Solo Film Directors Were Fired
    Ron Howard and Joe Johnston are possible contenders to replace Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.
    Quote Originally Posted by Borys Kit
    Creative differences is a term that is often used loosely when a director is fired from a Hollywood movie.


    But it actually appears to ring true in case of Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, who have been let go by Lucasfilm chief Kathleen Kennedy from directing the ‪Star Wars spinoff that centers on the fan-favorite character Han Solo.


    Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that the style and vision of Lord and Miller clashed with that of Lawrence Kasdan, the legendary screenwriter behind the classics Empire Strikes Back and ‪Raiders of the Lost Ark, who also wrote, with his son, Jon Kasdan, the script for the Han Solo stand-alone set (for now) to be released in 2018.


    Lord and Miller (21 Jump Street, The Lego Movie) have a comedic sensibility and improvisational style while Kasdan favors a strict adherence to the written word — what is on the page is what must be shot.


    The creative clash, according to one insider, also came down to differences in understanding the character of Han Solo. “People need to understand that Han Solo is not a comedic personality. He’s sarcastic and selfish,” said that source.


    The friction was felt almost immediately when the movie began shooting in February, sources say, but the directors always thought it could be worked through. Kennedy, the producer and head of Lucasfilm, decided to back her lifelong colleague, who shaped much of Solo’s character in Empire and ‪Return of the Jedi and who had a specific tone in mind for the new movie. The duo also didn’t feel they had the support of producer Allison Shearmur, who was acting as Lucasfilm’s representative on the London set.


    Lord and Miller, who had relocated to London with their families for preproduction and production of the movie, were said to have been blindsided by the firing, which they learned about Monday, according to one source, although another disputed that account.


    The production had gone on a short hiatus to review what had been shot and to clear the air.


    "Unfortunately, our vision and process weren’t aligned with our partners on this project. We normally aren’t fans of the phrase 'creative differences' but for once this cliché is true. We are really proud of the amazing and world-class work of our cast and crew," Lord and Miller said in a statement released Tuesday.


    Lucasfilm and owner Disney have already targeted their replacement, although the companies are keeping mum.


    Ron Howard is one of the names that has emerged, according to sources. Joe Johnston, who directed The Rocketeer and Jumanji, has been mentioned as another possible candidate. Others suggest that Kasdan, who has directed movies like ‪The Big Chill and Silverado, could step in as he is already in prime position to know what needs to be fixed. That move could be complicated by DGA rules preventing someone already working on a film taking over for a director that is being replaced except for a short-term emergency.


    It is expected that a new director will take the next several weeks, with the production shut down, to go over what Lord and Miller have shot, re-edit what they’ve filmed “and go from there,” according to one source.


    According to some observers, Lucasfilm should have known going in that a clash of tones could occur given Lord and Miller's previous work. But this is not the first time that Disney and Lucasfilm have had to take drastic turns on Star Wars movies. Last summer, the companies sidelined Gareth Edwards by bringing in Tony Gilroy to rewrite and direct substantial reshoots of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, a move that happened only five to six months before the movie was released. Rogue One proved to be a massive hit, both financially and critically.


    The studio now is more than willing to flex its muscle, and spend chunks of money, to protect the Star Wars brand and to ensure that it is not tarnished by a movie that doesn't deliver what fans want.


    Lord and Miller's next move is not immediately clear, but already rumors are circulating that the pair could return to The Flash, Warners' movie about the DC Comics hero to which they had been attached to helm several years ago. The project is currently on the hunt for a director.



    THR MAY 01, 2015:
    Inside a 'Star Wars' Firing: 'Fantastic Four' Problems Led to Director Josh Trank's Ouster

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    The Millennium Falcon has a new pilot.
    Ron Howard Steps in to Direct Han Solo Movie (Exclusive)


    'Star Wars' Finally Gets a Ron Howard Movie — Should Fans Cheer?
    The director, who once was offered 'Phantom Menace,' will be taking over the Han Solo movie from ousted filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller.

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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    THR OCTOBER 24, 2013:
    Writer Michael Arndt Exits 'Star Wars: Episode VII'


    Should There Be Such a Rush to Make 'Star Wars' Films?
    With the director shuffle on Lucasfilm's Han Solo movie, perhaps it's time to slow things down.


    Ron Howard Says Han Solo Film Was "a Little Opportunity That Came My Way"
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhonda Richford
    A day after being named the new director of Disney and Lucasfilm's untitled Han Solo movie, Ron Howard took to the stage at Cannes Lions on Friday and briefly discussed the opportunity to contribute to the Star Wars universe.


    Interviewed on stage by Martin Sorrell, the founder and CEO of British ad company WPP, he called the film "a little opportunity that came my way."


    The Oscar winner replaced Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street directors Phil Lord and Christoper Miller, who parted ways with the studio Tuesday citing "creative differences."


    Howard later also said about Star Wars that "I've been a fan forever," adding: "It's gratifying to lend my voice to the Star Wars universe now."


    The director also told the audience: "I've been around the Star Wars universe from the beginning," and explained George Lucas was conceiving the story while they were working on American Graffiti. When Lucas first told him the idea, he said he thought it sounded "crazy."


    Howard recalled that when he first saw Star Wars, he waited in line with his wife for two hours. "We left almost speechless, and I said, 'Do you want to see it again?'" he said. "And we got in line and waited another 90 minutes to see it twice the same day."


    Howard on Friday also discussed the Trump presidency and how it will one day portrayed on the screen, joking: "I'm looking forward to the day that ... this presidency is dramatized years from now that it's a hysterical musical comedy on Broadway called Trumped."


    Asked what's left to do for him, he said he'd love to do a Broadway musical and mentioned his team was working on an adaption of Nightshift and talking about possibly adapting Parenthood as well.


    Discussing the project that he is most proud of, Howard mentioned Apollo 13.


    Regarding the competition between Netflix, Amazon and others, Howard said: "I don't think there's going to be a winner. There may be a dominant platform, and I don't think it's going to be big screen movies."


    He also said about streaming video services: "It's an exciting time you can tell more stories to niche audiences creatively, it's liberating."


    Emilia Clarke, Woody Harrelson and Donald Glover will star in the Han Solo spin-off. Shooting is set to resume July 10.

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    Alden Shot First: New Rumors Reveal Behind-The-Scenes Han Solo Drama That Led To A New Director
    Alden Ehrenreich Had A Bad Feeling About This


    Quote Originally Posted by Bacon, Tom Bacon
    Just two days ago, Star Wars fans were shaken to learn that directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were parting ways with Lucasfilm. With production on the still-as-yet-untitled #HanSolo spinoff almost complete, the much-loved duo were flying off into the sunset. We've since learned that Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind, Apollo 13) is taking over.


    Something's clearly gone badly wrong in the house that George built, and the internet's been buzzing with fury and panic — after all, Lord and Miller earned a lot of love from fans with films like The Lego Movie and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. As the days go on, though, Lucasfilm insiders are quietly admitting that the project was a lot more troubled than we'd ever realized.


    StarWarsNewsNet, one of the biggest Star Wars fan-sites out there, has gradually managed to piece together some remarkable details, including the surprising role Alden Ehrenreich (the new Han Solo) played in the behind-the-scenes drama.


    A skilled actor who made his movie debut with 2009's Tetro, Ehrenreich is an up-and-coming talent who's managed to snag one of the most exciting roles of all. He was actually the first to audition for the part of young Han Solo, and ran through six months' worth of auditions before finally being cast. His performance has been described as fresh and original, while still honoring the essentials of the character.


    By all accounts, nobody at Lucasfilm has any doubt that he's the perfect man to bring the young Han Solo to life, and there have even apparently been rumblings that Lucasfilm may plan a Han Solo sequel in which Ehrenreich reprises the role.


    Here's the catch, though. According to StarWarsNewsNet, as production went on, Ehrenreich felt increasingly uncomfortable. Lord and Miller were pushing a Star Wars film unlike any other, with a strong element of screwball comedy. One Lucasfilm insider actually compared it to Jim Carrey's performance in Ace Ventura, and something about it just wasn't sitting comfortably with Ehrenreich, StarWarsNewsNet reports.


    Finally, he had enough. Ehrenreich raised his concerns with one of the film's producers, who let Lucasfilm head Kathleen Kennedy know about it; in light of Ehrenreich's concerns, Kennedy decided to review the existing footage, according to the report.


    For months now, we've been hearing positive news about the Han Solo spinoff. Insiders who watched individual scenes came away delighted; that's why fans were initially dismissive when rumors of "creative conflict" began to circulate online. It was only when all the scenes were put together, though, that Kathleen Kennedy realized that something just wasn't working, StarWarsNewsNet's sources say. The film wasn't faithful to Lawrence Kasdan's original script, with a high degree of improv and a zany tone that just didn't seem to fit the Galaxy Far, Far Away.


    Intriguingly, one insider told StarWarsNewsNet that there was even a continuity error that would have driven the fans wild, and Lord and Miller wouldn't budge on it.


    Lucasfilm seems to have called a hiatus on production — for a couple weeks while Ron Howard gets up to speed, Entertainment Weekly reports — and the company will have to order extensive reshoots. Whereas Gareth Edwards was willing to cooperate with Rogue One, Lord and Miller insisted on their own creative control. It's presumably at this point that Lord tweeted:
    What's so great about being reasonable

    By all accounts, Lucasfilm gave Lord and Miller an ultimatum — our way or the highway — and the duo wanted to do the film their way. "They thought they were brought on to make a Phil and Chris movie," a source close to the directors told EW, adding that they don't feel any anger at Ron Howard: "Somebody has to take over the movie."


    In an ironic touch, screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan, who encouraged Lucasfilm to hire the duo in the first place, reportedly pushed hard for their dismissal.


    The last two days have seen fans rage and fume. There's been a lot of blame to go around. Is this unfortunate situation the result of "dinosaurs" like Kennedy and Kasdan, as some fans claim? Or should Miller and Lord have been more willing to compromise? The truth is likely a lot more nuanced than we'd like to admit; when something goes wrong on this scale, it usually means everybody messed up somewhere.


    The one man who shines in all of this, though, is Alden Ehrenreich, an actor who's clearly committed to his role, and who dared to speak up when he felt the character was being dishonored. He's definitely got the bravery of Han Solo!

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    Default Re: Han Solo Begins

    'Star Wars' Firing Reveals a Disturbance in the Franchise
    New details emerge from the set of the troubled Han Solo movie (an editor fired, a last-minute acting coach hired) as insiders debate whether problems trace to directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, or if the Disney and Lucasfilm series can accommodate divergent styles.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Masters
    Matters had already reached a boiling point in mid-June when Phil Lord and Chris Miller, co-directors of the still-untitled young Han Solo movie, were in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon but didn’t start shooting until 1 p.m. That day the two used only three different setups — that is, three variations on camera placement — as opposed to the 12 to 15 that Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy had expected, according to sources with knowledge of the situation. Not only was the going slow, but the few angles that had been shot did not provide a wealth of options to use in editing the movie.


    This was hardly the first time Kennedy was unhappy with how the film was progressing. And as he looked at dailies from his home in Los Angeles, Lawrence Kasdan — screenwriter, executive producer and keeper of the Stars Wars flame — also was said to be displeased.


    Meanwhile, Lord and Miller, the exceptionally successful team behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street, were chafing, too, according to a source close to them. There were "deep fundamental philosophical differences" in filmmaking styles, this person says, and the directors felt they were being given "zero creative freedom." They also felt they were being asked to operate under "extreme scheduling constraints" and "were never given enough days for each scene from the very beginning."


    Shortly after the shoot in the Millennium Falcon, on June 20, the world learned that Kennedy — with the backing of Disney studio chief Alan Horn — had taken the extraordinary step of firing Lord and Miller. Obviously, Kennedy knew this would set off a storm of publicity that no one wants or needs in any movie — especially one in the Star Wars universe, where every move is closely watched by a gigantic audience with a sense of ownership. It's rare and undesirable enough to fire any director. Firing established players like Lord and Miller, who have a fan base ready to give them the benefit of any doubt? That shocked Hollywood's most seasoned veterans.


    Anxious to avoid an outright rupture, Kennedy is said to have made attempts first to support and eventually to supplant Lord and Miller to some degree, as happened with Gareth Edwards on the troubled Rogue One. In that case, screenwriter Tony Gilroy took on significant duties with the cooperation of Edwards; in this case, sources say, Kennedy attempted to cast Kasdan in that role. Unsurprisingly, Lord and Miller were less accommodating than Edwards, still a novice, had been. Lord and Miller declined to comment, as did Kennedy.


    As soon as shooting got underway, insiders say, it started to become clear that Kennedy’s stated intention of hiring directors who would put their own spin on Star Wars movies had led to a mismatch. Some insiders say that while the talent of Lord and Miller is undeniable, nothing in their background prepared them for a movie of this size and scope. These sources say they relied too heavily on the improvisational style that served them so well in live-action comedy and animation but does not work on a set with hundreds of crewmembers waiting for direction.


    “You have to make decisions much earlier than what they’re used to,” one of these sources say. “I don’t know if it’s because there were two of them but they were not decisive.” Production department heads began to complain. While the pair appeared to listen when told of festering problems, this person says their approach did not change.


    But the source close to Lord and Miller acknowledges they have always worked in an improvisational style and not just to add comedic elements. "They collaborate closely with their actors and give them creative freedom that, in their experience, brings out the actors' best performances," this person says. "Lawrence Kasdan would not allow this and demanded that every line was said word for word. To appease him and the studio, Lord and Miller would do several takes exactly as written and then shoot additional takes."


    Matters were coming to a head in May as the production moved from London to the Canary Islands. Lucasfilm replaced editor Chris Dickens (Macbeth) with Oscar-winner Pietro Scalia, a veteran of Ridley Scott films including Alien: Covenant and The Martian. And, not entirely satisfied with the performance that the directors were eliciting from Rules Don't Apply star Alden Ehrenreich, Lucasfilm decided to bring in an acting coach. (Hiring a coach is not unusual; hiring one that late in production is.) Lord and Miller suggested writer-director Maggie Kiley, who worked with them on 21 Jump Street.


    When Kennedy felt that these measures did not get the production on track, she asked Kasdan to come to London. Kasdan is said also to have been unhappy with the limited shots and displeased that Lord and Miller were calling out lines for the actors to try from behind the monitor rather than sticking with the script that he had written in collaboration with his son. (Lord and Miller had input on the script before shooting began.) “As a writer, producer and part of Star Wars world, you get on a plane when that happens,” says a person with knowledge of the situation.


    But Lord and Miller were not prepared to have Kasdan become a shadow director. With an impasse reached, Kennedy finally pulled the trigger. The next day, when the crew was told that Ron Howard would take over as director, sources say they broke into applause.


    Stepping in to replace directors who have been fired is not something that many filmmakers would want to do. Probably Howard is one of the few who could and would — at least, in this particular set of circumstances. Insiders say he was concerned about how Lord and Miller would react and has been emailing with them; another source says the two have been “very supportive, very elegant.” Howard arrives in London on June 26 and shooting, which began in February and was supposed to be completed in July, will continue into the first week of September as Howard captures new material. Still, an insider says much of what Lord and Miller shot will be “very usable.”


    How credit will be determined is up to the Directors Guild. What will happen next for Lord and Miller isn’t clear but they are in demand and have an open berth waiting for them to direct The Flash for Warner Bros., if they chose to take it. (They had left that film for the Han Solo movie but could return.)


    While Kennedy declined to comment on the episode, just a year ago, THR did a Q-and-A with her that sheds light on her thinking. Kennedy discussed her belief that within major franchises, it is possible to “take artistic license and creative risks.” She added, “If all you're doing is playing it safe — trying to make the same movie over and over again — that's when the audiences say, 'Oh, this is just a moneymaking machine.’ But if it's genuinely in service to the art form, then the franchise concept is being used in a way that's exciting.”


    But at the same time, Kennedy — speaking in the context of hiring young, relatively untested directors (as opposed to established filmmakers like Lord and Miller) — said these choices were “instinctual.” And she continued with a statement that seemed, perhaps presciently, to address what may have gone awry on the Han Solo movie: “One of the things I've come to realize since I've been in this position of keeping Star Wars going is that in addition to looking for somebody who can creatively have an impact, you're really looking for leadership skills. No one steps into these big movies without being able to genuinely lead the charge with hundreds of people and [handle] the relationship with the studio. That's a very difficult thing to do, and you don't know [a person can do] that until you get to spend time and watch somebody operate.”


    There are some in the industry who see an emerging pattern suggesting that Kennedy’s appetite for creative license and risk-taking will have to be curbed. Josh Trank was dismissed from the second Star Wars stand-alone film before he even started based on problems with Fantastic Four; Edwards, who conceived of Rogue One as a dark war film, was shunted aside; and now this. For all the talk of hiring filmmakers with their own vision, observers say Kennedy and Disney may be learning that the franchise is defined by a particular set of parameters. “All of the films have been 'troubled,'" says a top executive at a rival studio. “J.J. [Abrams] was powerful enough to push back on an unrealistic start date [for the first movie] but that was a tug of war. The last one was reshot by Tony [Gilroy] for months and now this? This is a systemic problem.”


    But an insider argues that Rian Johnson (Looper) shot Star Wars: The Last Jedi, set for release in December, seamlessly, proving that the right director can execute without major interference from Lucasfilm. The search for new and interesting filmmakers will continue and for many, perhaps, the siren call of Star Wars will be impossible to resist.


    On the Han Solo movie, a high-level insider says Kennedy and Disney "were hoping for a meeting of the minds [with Lord and Miller] that never came." But if had Kennedy fired them earlier, another source says, “People would say, 'Why the hell didn’t you try to work it out?’ You’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.”

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